§ 149 Fifth Edition

When the suitable homœopathic remedy has been thus selected and rightly employed, the acute disease we wish to cure, even though it be of a grave character and attended by many sufferings subsides insensibly, in a few hours if it be of recent date, in a few days if it be of a somewhat longer standing, along with all traces of indisposition, and nothing or almost nothing more of the artificial medicinal disease is perceived; there occurs, by rapid, imperceptible transitions, noting but restored health, recovery. Disease of long standing (and especially such as are of a complicated character) require for their cure a proportionately longer time. More especially do the chronic medicinal dyscrasia so often produced by allopathic bungling, along with the natural disease left uncured by it, require a much longer time for their recovery; often, indeed, are they incurable, in consequence of the shameful robbery of the patient’s strength and juices, the principal feat performed by allopathy in its so-called methods of treatment.

§ 149 Sixth Edition

Diseases of long standing (and especially such as are of a complicated character) require for their cure a proportionately longer time. More especially do the chronic medicinal dyscrasia so often produced by allopathic bungling along with the natural disease left uncured by it, require a much longer time for their recovery; often, indeed, are they incurable, in consequence of the shameful robbery of the patient’s strength and juices (venesections, purgatives, etc.), on account of long continued use of large doses of violently acting remedies given on the basis of empty, false theories for alleged usefulness in cases of disease appearing similar, also in prescribing unsuitable mineral baths, etc., the principal feat performed by allopathy in its so-called methods of treatment.

Commentary:

"When a appropriate application of the homoeopathic remedy has been made, the acute disease which is to be cured, however malignant and painful it may be, subsides in a few hours, if recent, and in a few days, if it is somewhat older," etc.

 If  such diseases do not subside, the the right remedy has  not been found. That will force the true homoeopathic physician to seek the proper remedy. Let not the blame be placed upon the failure of the homoeopathic system , but let it be placed upon the one who practices it.

Just so sure as you find the homoeopathic remedy in a case of influenza , just so sure you will see that fever fall and that child improve ; while the rash will remain out; we find that in a few days the child is so much better he wants to go to school. But then we treat the child and not the fever.

Just so sure as the physician has in mind the rash of scarlet fever or of measles as the main element of the disease, he will make a failure, and the patient will not recover so, speedily ; but as a matter of fact, the homoeopathic physician prescribes for the patient on that which characterizes the sickness, even though it be what is called a self-limiting disease under various names.

"When a appropriate application of the homoeopathic remedy has been made, the chronic  disease which is to be cured, require for their cure a proportionately longer time".

Such chronic disease require much longer time because of any of one or more of the following reasons

(1) chronic medicinal health problem (complication) often produced by incompetent allopathic treatment  along with the natural disease left uncured by it. E.g. antibiotics 

(2) In consequence of the discreditable robbery of the patient’s strength   on account of long continued use of large doses of violently acting remedies and procedures (venesections, purgatives, unsuitable mineral baths etc.)

 


 

 

§ 150

If a patient complain of one or more trivial symptoms, that have been only observed a short time previously, the physician should not regard this as a fully developed disease but requires serious medical aid. A slight alteration in the diet and regimen will usually suffice to dispel such an indisposition.
Commentary:

§ 150. This treats of one of the difficulties in treatment  we have to contend with.

ken t says "If a patient complains of slightly accessory symptoms which have just appeared, the physician ought not to take this state of things for a perfect malady that seriously demands medicinal aid," etc., etc.

It is right , when your patients are under  treatment, to prescribe for a cold, but only when it is not an usual one. If the cold is likely to cause serious trouble, then you must prescribe for it ; slight indisposition, should not receive remedies.

You will have patients that will come to you at every change of the weather, at every attack of snuffles the baby has, at every little headache or every little pain. If you then go on to change your remedy or prescribe for each one of these little spells of indisposition, you will, in the course of a little while, have such a state of disorder in the individual that you will wonder what is the matter with this patient.

You had better give her no medicine at all or a placebo or a sugar pill that have been drenched in few drops of placebo/alcohol , and let the indisposition pass off of itself, and if she is wise and strong and can feel confidence you can say to her that she does not need medicine for this attack ; but occasionally give her a dose of constitutional medicine when these little attacks are not on.

Watch it, however, and it may at the close develop some constitutional manifestations and throw light upon the patient that you have been treating.

ACUTE DISEASE V/S INDISPOSITION

On the other hand, it is an easy matter to, prescribe for severe acute diseases 
  

INDISPOSITION

The slight indispositions are 

You will be amazed after prescribing a number of years, and your patients have gained confidence in you, that when they come in with these little trivial ailments they won't have them after a few powders of sugar.

They will say : "Doctor, my trouble went off marvelously."

This is what is meant by letting the little things alone and not interfering. Severe diseases exhibit a strong degree of symptoms, and hence you have something to do.

 

 


§ 151

But if the patient complain of a few violent sufferings, the physician will usually find, on investigation, several other symptoms besides, although of a slighter character, which furnish a complete picture of the disease.

Commentary:

§151. "But if the few symptoms of which the patient complains are very violent, the physician who attentively observes him will generally discover many others which are less developed and which furnish a perfect picture of the sickness."

§ 152

The worse of the acute disease is, of so much the more numerous and striking symptoms is it generally composed, but with so much the more certainly may a suitable remedy for it be found, if there be a sufficient number of medicines known, with respect to their positive action, to choose from. Among the lists of symptoms of many medicines it will not be difficult to find one from whose separate disease elements an antitype of curative artificial disease, very like the totality of the symptoms of the natural disease, may be constructed, and such a medicine is the desired remedy.
Commentary:

In acute diseases  as signs and symptoms are more intense there is a presence of number of striking symptoms and physician can form a proper portrait of the disease. For proper selection , knowledge of pathogenitic symptoms of medicine is essential. If the physician has knowledge of number of medicines, by matching symptoms of medicines with that of symptoms of disease he can select medicine easily.

§ 153 Fifth Edition

In this search for a homœopathic specific remedy, that is to say, in this comparison of the collective symptoms of the natural disease with the list of symptoms of known medicines, in order to find among these an artificial morbific agent corresponding by similarity to the disease to be cured, the more striking, singular, uncommon and peculiar (characteristic) signs and symptoms1 of the case of disease are chiefly and most solely to be kept in view; for it is more particularly these that very similar ones in the list of symptoms of the selected medicine must correspond to, in order to constitute it the most suitable for effecting the cure. The more general and undefined symptoms: loss of appetite, headache, debility, restless sleep, discomfort, and so forth, demand but little attention when of that vague and indefinite character, if they cannot be more accurately described, as symptoms of such a general nature are observed in almost every disease and from almost every drug.

1 Dr. von Bonninghausen, who has already distinguished himself by his labours in connection with the new system of medicine, has lately increased our obligation to him by the publication of his important little book setting forth the characteristic symptoms, more particularly of the antipsoric medicines, entitled Uebersicht der Hauptwirkungs-Sphure der antips. Arz., Munster, bei Coppenrath, 1883, and the appendix thereto (containing the antisyphilitic and the antisycotic medicines) at the end of the second edition of his Systematisch-alphabetisches Repertorium der antipsorischen Arzneien, bei Coppenrath in Munster.

§ 153 Sixth Edition

In this search for a homœopathic specific remedy, that is to say, in this comparison of the collective symptoms of the natural disease with the list of symptoms of known medicines, in order to find among these an artificial morbific agent corresponding by similarity to the disease to be cured, the more striking, singular, uncommon and peculiar (characteristic) signs and symptoms1 of the case of disease are chiefly and most solely to be kept in view; for it is more particularly these that very similar ones in the list of symptoms of the selected medicine must correspond to, in order to constitute it the most suitable for effecting the cure. The more general and undefined symptoms: loss of appetite, headache, debility, restless sleep, discomfort, and so forth, demand but little attention when of that vague and indefinite character, if they cannot be more accurately described, as symptoms of such a general nature are observed in almost every disease and from almost every drug.

1 Dr. von Bonninghausen, by the publication of the characteristic symptoms of homœopathic medicines and his repertory has rendered a great service to homœopathy as well as Dr. J.H.G. Jahr in his handbook of principal symptoms.
Commentary:

 

Nature of Symptoms:
          General
          Common
          Particular
Grades of symptoms
          General
                    First Grade
                    Second Grade
                    Third Grade
          Common
                    First Grade
                    Second Grade
                    Third Grade
          Particular
                    First Grade
                    Second Grade
                    Third Grade

§ 153 is the one that teaches more particularly how the process of individualization or discrimination shall be carried out.

 

The homoeopathic physician may think he has his case written out very well, but he does not know whether he has or not until he has understands the idea of this paragraph properly. kent have beautifully written  "He may have page after page of symptoms, and not know what the remedy is, and if he takes the record to a master the master will say :

"You have no case !"

"Why, I have plenty of symptoms."

"But you have no case. You have left your case out ; you have left the image of the sickness out, because you have fated to get anything that characterizes it. You have plenty of symptoms, but have not anything characteristic. You have not taken your case properly."

After you have mastered this paragraph you will know whether you have taken your case appropriately, you will know whether you have something to present to a master. Most of the homoeopaths who do not know this paragraph is usually unsuccessful in their practice.

Many homoeopaths  will ask you what a characteristic is, and if it is some one peculiar thing that guides to a remedy.

Eliciting a rare, peculiar uncommon symptoms?

Pages and pages of symptoms in a case may not be useful if it do not  have individualizing characteristics to enable you to classify that which you have and, if you must settle down to a few remedies, to ascertain which of these is more important than another, or most important of all. You cannot individualize unless you have that which characterizes.

Suppose that you have been conversant with a large number of cases of measles, for instance, but along comes one of which you say to yourself,

"That is strange ; I never saw such a thing as that before in a case of measles. It is peculiar."

You  at once distinguish, it as something individual, because it is strange and rare and peculiar. You do not know what remedy has that symptom.

Then you begin to search your repertory, or consult more experienced homoeopaths, and you find in the repertory, or upon consultation, that such a medicine has that thing as a strong feature, as a high grade symptom, and it is as peculiar in the remedy as in your patient, though you have never seen it before.

You may have seen a thousands of  cases of measles without seeing that very thing. That peculiar thing that you see in measles relates to the patient and not to the disease, and as the sole duty of the physician is to heal the sick that peculiar thing will open the whole case to a remedy.

When you find that the remedy has that symptom, along with the other symptoms, you must attach some significance to it, and when there are two or three of these peculiar symptoms they form the characteristic features.

What constitute a common symptom ?

Taking measles as an example.

We shall at once see that the common symptoms are those that appear in all cases of measles, that you would expect to find in measles. It would be strange to have measles without any rash ; that would be peculiar. We know that the absence of rash is a peculiar symptoms. Either it is not measles, or the absence of the rash is a serious state.

Taking influenza as an example.

Suppose it is a influenza. The patient has intense beat, an ordinary fever, coming in the afternoon and running through the night, with hot hands and feet, high temperature, dry tongue, etc.

You would say it is common if he has thirst, because almost anybody who has fever would want water. Nothing is so natural to put fire out with as water, and the absence of thirst in a fever is strange, is rare and uncommon, peculiar and striking. You would ask yourself at once, is it not strange that he does not have thirst with such a high temperature ? You at once strike to the remedies that are thirstless. You would not think of hunting up a remedy that has thirst. 

Pathognomonic is common symptoms  because all the symptoms are commonly present in every individual suffering from same class of disease. Example. All measles have eruptions, all typhoid has fever.

An absence of the pathognomonic characterizes that particular disease in that patient, and therefore means the individual symptoms the  patient is suffering from is rare, peculiar, characteristic, symptoms.  Now you have things that characterize the patient, and the specific remedy for the patient will be the simillimum. 

Kent says "It is necessary to know sicknesses, not from pathology, not from physical diagnosis, no matter how important these branches are, but by symptoms, the language of nature.

A true homoeopathic prescription cannot be made on pathology, on morbid anatomy ; because provings have never been pushed in that direction. Pathology gives us the results of disease, and not the language of nature appealing to the intelligent physician.

Symptomatology is the true subject to know for a Homoeopath.

No man, who is only familar with morbid anatomy and pathognomonic symptoms, can make homoeopathic prescriptions.

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