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Women’s disease and treatment we offer in our clinic

 

THYROID DISEASE

Your thyroid (THY-roid) is a small gland found at the base of your neck, just below your Adam's apple. The thyroid produces two main hormones called T3 and T4. These hormones travel in your blood to all parts of your body. The thyroid hormones control the rate of many activities in your body. These include how fast you burn calories and how fast your heart beats. All of these activities together are known as your body's metabolism. A thyroid that is working right will produce the right amounts of hormones needed to keep your body’s metabolism working at a rate that is not too fast or too slow.

What kinds of thyroid problems can affect women?

Women are more likely than men to develop thyroid disorders. Thyroid disorders that can affect women include:

  • Disorders that cause hyperthyroidism
  • Disorders that cause hypothyroidism
  • Thyroid nodules
  • Thyroiditis
  • Thyroid cancer
  • Goiter

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Hyperthyroidism

Some disorders cause the thyroid to make more thyroid hormones than the body needs. This is called hyperthyroidism, or overactive thyroid. The most common cause of hyperthyroidism is Graves' disease. Graves’ disease is an autoimmune disorder, in which the body's own defense system, called the immune system, stimulates the thyroid. This causes it to make too much of the thyroid hormones. Hyperthyroidism can also be caused by thyroid nodules that prompt excess thyroid hormones to be made.

Symptoms

 

At first, you might not notice symptoms of hyperthyroidism. They usually begin slowly. But over time, a speeded up metabolism can cause symptoms such as:

  • Weight loss, even if you eat the same or more food
  • Eating more than usual
  • Rapid or irregular heartbeat or pounding of your heart
  • Anxiety
  • Irritability
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Trembling in your hands and fingers
  • Increased sweating
  • Increased sensitivity to heat
  • Muscle weakness
  • More frequent bowel movements
  • Less frequent menstrual periods with lighter than normal menstrual flow

In addition to these symptoms, people with hyperthyroidism may have osteoporosis, or weak, brittle bones. In fact, hyperthyroidism might affect your bones before you have any of the other symptoms of the disorder. This is especially true of postmenopausal women, who are already at high risk of osteoporosis.

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism is when your thyroid does not make enough thyroid hormones. It is also called underactive thyroid. The most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States is Hashimoto's disease. Hashimoto’s disease is an autoimmune disease, in which the immune system mistakenly attacks the thyroid. This attack damages the thyroid so that it does not make enough hormones. Hypothyroidism also can be caused by:

  • Treatment of hyperthyroidism
  • Radiation treatment of certain cancers
  • Thyroid removal

In rare cases, problems with the pituitary gland can cause the thyroid to be less active.

Symptoms

Symptoms of hypothyroidism tend to develop slowly, often over several years. At first, you may just feel tired and sluggish. Later, you may develop other symptoms of a slowed down metabolism, including:

  • Weight gain, even though you are not eating more food
  • Increased sensitivity to cold
  • Constipation
  • Muscle weakness
  • Joint or muscle pain
  • Depression
  • Fatigue (feeling very tired)
  • Pale dry skin
  • A puffy face
  • A hoarse voice
  • Excessive menstrual bleeding

In addition to these symptoms, people with hypothyroidism may have high blood levels of LDL cholesterol. This is the so-called "bad" cholesterol, which can increase your risk for heart disease.

Nine foods to avoid in hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism can be a tricky condition to manage, and what you eat can interfere with your treatment. Some nutrients heavily influence the function of the thyroid gland, and certain foods can inhibit your body's ability to absorb the replacement hormones you may take as part of your thyroid treatment. There's no such thing as a "hypothyroidism diet" that will make you well, but eating smart can help you feel better despite the condition. Here are nine foods to limit or avoid as you manage hypothyroidism.

NINE FOODS TO AVOID IN HYPOTHYROIDISM

1.       Soy

2.       Cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli and cabbage

3.       Gluten, a protein found in foods processed from wheat, barley, rye, and other grains

4.       fats

5.       Sugary Foods

 

6.       Processed foods

7.       Caffeine

8.       Alcohol

 

9.       Tapioca

1.      Soy

The hormone estrogen can interfere with your body's ability to use thyroid hormone, Soy is loaded with plant-based phytoestrogen, and some researchers believe too much soy may increase a person's risk for hypothyroidism. People with hypothyroidism should moderate their intake of soy. However, because soy hasn't been definitively linked to hypothyroidism, there are no specific dietary guidelines.

2.      Cruciferous vegetables

Cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage, can interfere with the production of thyroid hormone, particularly people who have an iodine deficiency. Digesting these vegetables can block the thyroid's ability to absorb iodine, which is essential for normal thyroid function. People with hypothyroidism may want to limit their intake of broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, turnips, and bok choy. Proper Cooking the vegetables can reduce the effect that cruciferous vegetables have on the thyroid gland. Limiting your intake to 5 ounces a day appears to have no adverse effect on thyroid function.

3.      Gluten

People with hypothyroidism should consider minimizing their intake of gluten, a protein found in foods processed from wheat, barley, rye, and other grains. Gluten can irritate the small intestine and may hamper absorption of thyroid hormone replacement medication.

4.      Fats

They have been found to disrupt the body's ability to absorb thyroid hormone replacement medicines. Fats may also interfere with the thyroid's ability to produce hormone as well. Some health care professionals recommend that you cut out all fried foods and reduce your intake of fats from sources such as butter, mayonnaise, margarine, and fatty cuts of meat.

5.      Sugary Foods

Hypothyroidism can cause the body's metabolism to slow down. That means it's easy to put on pounds if you aren't careful. "You want to avoid the foods with excess amounts of sugar because it's a lot of calories with no nutrients," she says. It's best to reduce the amount of sugar you eat or try to eliminate it completely from your diet.

6.      Processed foods tend to have a lot of sodium, and people with hypothyroidism should avoid sodium. Having an underactive thyroid increases a person's risk for high blood pressure, and too much sodium further increases this risk. Read the Nutrition Facts label on the packaging of processed foods to find options lowest in sodium. People with an increased risk for high blood pressure should restrict their sodium intake to 1,500 milligrams a day, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

7.      Caffeine has been found to block absorption of thyroid hormone replacement. People who were taking their thyroid medication with their morning coffee had uncontrollable thyroid levels.

8.      Alcohol

Alcohol consumption can wreak havoc on both thyroid hormone levels in the body and the ability of the thyroid to produce hormone. Alcohol appears to have a toxic effect on the thyroid gland and suppresses the ability of the body to use thyroid hormone. Ideally, people with hypothyroidism should cut out alcohol completely or drink in careful moderation.

9.      Tapioca: Cassava bears special mention here.  You may have heard of it because it is the starchy root vegetable from which tapioca is made, but cassava is also a popular staple food in many Third World countries, where it is eaten boiled, mashed, or ground into flour.  Fresh cassava root contains a harmless substance called linamarin, which can turn into hydrocyanic acid (aka cyanide!) when the plant is damaged or eaten. Flaxseeds also contain linamarin. Cyanide is very toxic, so the human body converts it into thiocyanate (which, although it does interfere with thyroid function, is less toxic than cyanide and easier for the body to eliminate).

Thiocyanates are sulfur-containing compounds found in a variety of popular vegetables. Thiocyanates make it harder for the thyroid gland to absorb iodine because they compete with iodine for entry into the gland.  This effect can be minimized by supplementing the diet with iodine; the excess iodine can then crowd out the thiocyanate and win the competition. Thiocyanates weaken the activity of the enzyme thyroid peroxidase, which is required to insert iodine into thyroid hormone.  This effect can be greatly reduced by iodine supplementation.

Thyroid nodule 

A thyroid nodule is a swelling in one section of the thyroid gland. The nodule can be solid or filled with fluid or blood. You can have just one thyroid nodule or many. Most thyroid nodules do not cause symptoms. But some thyroid nodules make too much of the thyroid hormones, causing hyperthyroidism. Sometimes, nodules get to be big enough to cause problems with swallowing or breathing. In fewer than 10 percent of cases, thyroid nodules are cancerous.

Thyroid nodules are quite common. By the time you reach the age of 50, you have a 50 percent chance of having a thyroid nodule larger than a half inch wide. We do not know why nodules form in otherwise normal thyroids.

You can sometimes see or feel a thyroid nodule yourself. Try standing in front of a mirror and raise your chin slightly. Look for a bump on either side of your windpipe below your Adam's apple. If the bump moves up and down when you swallow, it may be a thyroid nodule. Ask your doctor to look at it.

Thyroiditis

Thyroiditis is inflammation, or swelling, of the thyroid. There are several types of thyroiditis, one of which is Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Other types of thyroiditis include:

Postpartum thyroidits

Postpartum thyroiditis is a phenomenon observed following pregnancy and may involve hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism or the two sequentially.  As in Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, postpartum thyroiditis is associated with the development of anti-thyroid (anti-thyroid peroxidase, anti-thyroglobulin) antibodies. Women with positive antithyroid antibodies are at a much higher risk of developing postpartum thyroiditis than women who do not have have positive antibodies. It is believed that women who develop postpartum thyroiditis have an underlying asymptomatic autoimmune thyroiditis that flares in the postpartum period when there are fluctuations in immune function. Like Hashimoto's disease, postpartum thyroiditis seems to be caused by a problem with the immune system. In the United States, postpartum thyroiditis occurs in about 5 to 10 percent of women.

TWO PHASES OF POSTPARTUM THYROIDITS

The first phase: starts 1 to 4 months after giving birth. In this phase, you may get symptoms of hyperthyroidism because the damaged thyroid is leaking thyroid hormones out into the bloodstream. The thyrotoxic phase occurs 1-4 months after delivery of a child, lasts for 1-3 months and is associated with symptoms including anxiety, insomnia, palpitations (fast heart rate), fatigue, weight loss, and irritability. Since these symptoms are often attributed to being postpartum and the stress of having a new baby, the thyrotoxic phase of postpartum thyroiditis is often missed.

The second phase starts about 4 to 8 months after delivery. In this phase, you may get symptoms of hypothyroidism because, by this time, the thyroid has lost most of its hormones. Not everyone with postpartum thyroiditis goes through both phases. In most women who have postpartum thyroiditis, thyroid function returns to normal within 12 to 18 months after symptoms start. It is much more common for women to present in the hypothyroid phase, which typically occurs 4-8 months after delivery and may last up to 9 –12 months. Typical symptoms include fatigue, weight gain, constipation, dry skin, depression and poor exercise tolerance. Most women will have return of their thyroid function to normal within 12-18 months of the onset of symptoms. However, approximately 20% of those that go into a hypothyroid phase will remain hypothyroid.

Risk factors for postpartum thyroiditis include having:

  • An autoimmune disease, like type 1 diabetes
  • A personal history or family history of thyroid disorders
  • Having had postpartum thyroiditis after a previous pregnancy

Silent or painless thyroiditis
Symptoms are the same as in postpartum thyroiditis, but they are not related to having given birth.

Subacute thyroiditis
Symptoms are the same as in postpartum and silent thyroiditis, but the inflammation in the thyroid leads to pain in the neck, jaw, or ear. Unlike the other types of thyroiditis, subacute thyroiditis may be caused by an infection.

Thyroid cancer

Most people with thyroid cancer have a thyroid nodule that is not causing any symptoms. If you have a thyroid nodule, there is a small chance it may be thyroid cancer. To tell if the nodule is cancerous, your doctor will have to do certain tests. A few people with thyroid cancer may have symptoms. If the cancer is big enough, it may cause swelling you can see in the neck. It may also cause pain or problems swallowing. Some people get a hoarse voice.

Thyroid cancer is rare compared with other types of cancer. It is more common in people who:

  • Have a history of exposure of the thyroid to radiation (but not routine X-ray exposure, as in dental X-rays or mammograms)
  • Have a family history of thyroid cancer
Are older than 40 years of age

Goiter

A goiter is an abnormally enlarged thyroid gland. Causes of goiter include:

  • Iodine deficiency. Iodine is a mineral that your thyroid uses for making thyroid hormones. Not getting enough iodine in your food and water can cause your thyroid to get bigger. This cause of goiter is uncommon in the United States because iodine is added to table salt.
  • Hashimoto's disease
  • Graves' disease
  • Thyroid nodules
  • Thyroiditis
  • Thyroid cancer

Usually, the only symptom of a goiter is a swelling in your neck. But a very large or advanced goiter can cause a tight feeling in your throat, coughing, or problems swallowing or breathing.

Having a goiter does not always mean that your thyroid is not making the right amount of hormones. Depending on the cause of your goiter, your thyroid could be making too much, not enough, or the right amount of hormones.

Hashimoto's disease

 It is a condition in which your immune system attacks your thyroid, a small gland at the base of your neck below your Adam's apple. The thyroid gland is part of your endocrine system, which produces hormones that coordinate many of your body's activities.

The resulting  inflammation from Hashimoto's disease, also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, often leads to an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism). Hashimoto's disease is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States. It primarily affects middle-aged women but also can occur in men and women of any age and in children.

Doctors test your thyroid function to help detect Hashimoto's disease. Treatment of Hashimoto's disease with thyroid hormone replacement usually is simple and effective.

Hashimoto's disease is an autoimmune disorder in which your immune system creates antibodies that damage your thyroid gland. Doctors don't know what causes your immune system to attack your thyroid gland. Some scientists think a virus or bacterium might trigger the response, while others believe a genetic flaw may be involved. A combination of factors — including heredity, sex and age — may determine your likelihood of developing the disorder.

 

Hashimoto's disease typically progresses slowly over years and causes chronic thyroid damage, leading to a drop in thyroid hormone levels in your blood. The signs and symptoms are mainly those of an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism).

Signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism include:

·         Fatigue and sluggishness

·         Increased sensitivity to cold

·         Constipation

·         Pale, dry skin

·         A puffy face

·         Hoarse voice

·         Unexplained weight gain — occurring infrequently and rarely exceeding 10 to 20 pounds, most of which is fluid

·         Muscle aches, tenderness and stiffness, especially in your shoulders and hips

·         Pain and stiffness in your joints and swelling in your knees or the small joints in your hands and feet

·         Muscle weakness, especially in your lower extremities

·         Excessive or prolonged menstrual bleeding (menorrhagia)

·         Depression

Graves' disease

 Is an immune system disorder that results in the overproduction of thyroid hormones (hyperthyroidism). Although a number of disorders may result in hyperthyroidism, Graves' disease is a common cause.

Because thyroid hormones affect a number of different body systems, signs and symptoms associated with Graves' disease can be wide ranging and significantly influence your overall well-being. Although Graves' disease may affect anyone, it's more common among women and before the age of 40.

Graves' disease is caused by a malfunction in the body's disease-fighting immune system, although the exact reason why this happens is still unknown.

One normal immune system response is the production of antibodies designed to target a specific virus, bacterium or other foreign substance. In Graves' disease — for reasons that aren't well understood — the body produces an antibody to one part of the cells in the thyroid gland, a hormone-producing gland in the neck.

Normally, thyroid function is regulated by a hormone released by a tiny gland at the base of the brain (pituitary gland). The antibody associated with Graves' disease — thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) — acts like the regulatory pituitary hormone. That means that TRAb overrides the normal regulation of the thyroid, causing an overproduction of thyroid hormones (hyperthyroidism).

 

The primary homoeopathic treatment goals are to inhibit the overproduction of thyroid hormones and lessen the severity of symptoms.

 

Common signs and symptoms of Graves' disease include:

·         Anxiety and irritability

·         A fine tremor of your hands or fingers

·         Heat sensitivity and an increase in perspiration or warm, moist skin

·         Weight loss, despite normal eating habits

·         Enlargement of your thyroid gland (goiter)

·         Change in menstrual cycles

·         Erectile dysfunction or reduced libido

·         Frequent bowel movements

·         Bulging eyes (Graves' ophthalmopathy)

·         Thick, red skin usually on the shins or tops of the feet (Graves' dermopathy)

·         Rapid or irregular heartbeat (palpitations)

Graves' ophthalmopathy

About 30 percent of people with Graves' disease show some signs and symptoms of a condition known as Graves' ophthalmopathy. In Graves' ophthalmopathy, inflammation and other immune system events affect muscles and other tissues around your eyes.

This condition results from a buildup of certain carbohydrates in the skin — the cause of which also isn't known. It appears that the same antibody that can cause thyroid dysfunction may also have an "attraction" to tissues surrounding the eyes.

Graves' ophthalmopathy often appears at the same time as hyperthyroidism or several months later. But signs and symptoms of ophthalmopathy may appear years before or after the onset of hyperthyroidism. Graves' ophthalmopathy can also occur even if there's no hyperthyroidism.

 The resulting signs and symptoms may include:

·         Bulging eyes (exophthalmos)

·         Gritty sensation in the eyes

·         Pressure or pain in the eyes

·         Puffy or retracted eyelids

·         Reddened or inflamed eyes

·         Light sensitivity

·         Double vision

·         Vision loss

Graves' dermopathy

An uncommon manifestation of Graves' disease, called Graves' dermopathy, is the reddening and thickening of the skin, most often on your shins or the tops of your feet.

Although anyone can develop Graves' disease, a number of factors can increase the risk of disease. These risk factors include the following:

·         Family history. Because a family history of Graves' disease is a known risk factor, there is likely a gene or genes that can make a person more susceptible to the disorder.

·         Gender. Women are much more likely to develop Graves' disease than are men.

·         Age. Graves' disease usually develops in people younger than 40.

·         Other autoimmune disorders. People with other disorders of the immune system, such as type 1 diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis, have an increased risk.

·         Emotional or physical stress. Stressful life events or illness may act as a trigger for the onset of Graves' disease among people who are genetically susceptible.

·         Pregnancy. Pregnancy or recent childbirth may increase the risk of the disorder, particularly among women who are genetically susceptible.

·         Smoking. Cigarette smoking, which can affect the immune system, increases the risk of Graves' disease. Smokers who have Graves' disease are also at increased risk of developing Graves' ophthalmopathy.

Homoeopathic management of  DISEASES AFFECTING THYROID in our clinic

All types of disease affecting thyroids can managed by Homoeopathic drugs. Since any disease affecting thyroid brings about changes in whole body totality of symptoms is an essential in the treating thyroid problems.  SYNTHESIS REPERTORY; A HOMOEOPATHIC BOOK mentions many remedies for different thyroid problems. In synthesis under chapter External throat it mentions about goitre which has about 86 remedies. In the same book under general chapter there is mention about both hyper and hypothyroidism. It mentions about 16 remedies for hyperthyroidism and 30 remedies for hyporthyroidism. It mentions about 88 remedies for Graves’ disease and exophthalmic goiter.

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)
Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that typically affects the small joints in your hands and feet and loss of function in your joints. Unlike the wear-and-tear damage of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis affects the lining of your joints, causing a painful swelling that can eventually result in bone erosion and joint deformity.

An autoimmune disorder, rheumatoid arthritis occurs when your immune system mistakenly attacks your own body's tissues. In addition to causing joint problems, rheumatoid arthritis sometimes can affect other organs of the body — such as the skin, eyes, lungs and blood vessels. Although rheumatoid arthritis can occur at any age, it usually begins after age 40. The disorder is much more common in women.

Treatment focuses on controlling symptoms and preventing joint damage.

Signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis may include:

·         Tender, warm, swollen joints

·         Morning stiffness that may last for hours

·         Firm bumps of tissue under the skin on your arms (rheumatoid nodules)

·         Fatigue, fever and weight loss

Early rheumatoid arthritis tends to affect your smaller joints first — particularly the joints that attach your fingers to your hands and your toes to your feet.

As the disease progresses, symptoms often spread to the wrists, knees, ankles, elbows, hips and shoulders. In most cases, symptoms occur in the same joints on both sides of your body.

Rheumatoid arthritis signs and symptoms may vary in severity and may even come and go. Periods of increased disease activity, called flares, alternate with periods of relative remission — when the swelling and pain fade or disappear. Over time, rheumatoid arthritis can cause joints to deform and shift out of place.

Causes

Rheumatoid arthritis occurs when your immune system attacks the synovium — the lining of the membranes that surround your joints. The resulting inflammation thickens the synovium, which can eventually destroy the cartilage and bone within the joint. The tendons and ligaments that hold the joint together weaken and stretch. Gradually, the joint loses its shape and alignment.

Doctors don't know what starts this process, although a genetic component appears likely. While your genes don't actually cause rheumatoid arthritis, they can make you more susceptible to environmental factors — such as infection with certain viruses and bacteria — that may trigger the disease.

Rheumatoid arthritis increases your risk of developing:

·         Osteoporosis. Rheumatoid arthritis itself, along with some medications used for treating rheumatoid arthritis, can increase your risk of osteoporosis — a condition that weakens your bones and makes them more prone to fracture.

·         Carpal tunnel syndrome. If rheumatoid arthritis affects your wrists, the inflammation can compress the nerve that serves most of your hand and fingers.

·         Heart problems. Rheumatoid arthritis can increase your risk of hardened and blocked arteries, as well as inflammation of the sac that encloses your heart.

·         Lung disease. People with rheumatoid arthritis have an increased risk of inflammation and scarring of the lung tissues, which can lead to progressive shortness of breath.

Risk factors

Factors that may increase your risk of rheumatoid arthritis include:

·         Sex. Women are more likely to develop rheumatoid arthritis.

·         Age. Rheumatoid arthritis can occur at any age, but it most commonly begins between the ages of 40 and 60.

·         Family history. If a member of your family has rheumatoid arthritis, you may have an increased risk of the disease.

Homoeopathic management of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) in our clinic

SYNTHESIS REPERTORY A HOMEOPATHIC BOOK mentions about 487 SYMPTOMS OF RHEUMATIC AFFECTION ALONE. In the same book under chapter extremity 296 medicines are mentioned for rheumatic joint pain.

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ALL CONTRIBUTE TO RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS.

SEXUAL PROBLEMS OF FEMALE:

Normal Sexual intercourse, or coitus or   copulation-SPOUSES GUIDE TO ART OF LOVE MAKING

Copulation or sexual intercourse is  principally the insertion and thrusting of a male's penis, usually when erect, into a female's vagina for the purposes of sexual pleasure or reproduction. It is an act of sexual procreation between a man and a woman; the man's penis is inserted into the woman's vagina and excited until orgasm and ejaculation occur.  Sequence of physical and emotional changes that occur as a person becomes sexually aroused and participates in sexually stimulating activities, including sexual intercourse and masturbation is known as sexual response cycle. Knowing how your body responds during each phase of the cycle can enhance your relationship and help you pinpoint the cause of any sexual problems.

Phases of sexual respond cycle

The sexual response cycle has four phases: excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution. Both men and women experience these phases, although the timing usually is different. For example, it is unlikely that both partners will reach orgasm at the same time. In addition, the intensity of the response and the time spent in each phase varies from person to person. Understanding these differences may help partners better understand one another's bodies and responses, and enhance the sexual experience.

We discuss both male and female sexual response cycle since that is important in solving the sexual problems. Four phases of sexual response cycle include excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution.

Phase 1: Excitement

General characteristics of the excitement phase, which can last from a few minutes to several hours, include the following:

·         Muscle tension increases.

·         Heart rate quickens and breathing is accelerated.

·         Skin may become flushed (blotches of redness appear on the chest and back).

·         Nipples become hardened or erect.

·         Blood flow to the genitals increases, resulting in swelling of the woman's clitoris and labia minora (inner lips), and erection of the man's penis.

·         Vaginal lubrication begins.

·         The outer labia lay flat, revealing the inner labia which swell and darken in color.

·         The woman's breasts become fuller and the vaginal walls begin to swell.

·         The man's testicles swell, his scrotum tightens, and he begins secreting a lubricating liquid.

Phase 2: Plateau

General characteristics of the plateau phase, which extends to the brink of orgasm, include the following:

·         The changes begun in phase 1 are intensified.

·         The vagina continues to swell from increased blood flow, and the vaginal walls turn a dark purple.

·         The inner lips thicken more, as much as two or three times normal, and may part, making the entrance to the vagina visible. The inner and outer labia darken, becoming quite dark just before orgasm. Women who have been pregnant have a better blood supply to the genitals, and their labia will darken more than before they had children.

·         The vagina expands and elongates, ballooning out in the deepest two-thirds. The outer one-third of the vaginal wall thickens (due to increased blood flow) and contracts, making the entrance tighter.

·         The uterus elevates to its highest point

·         The woman's clitoris becomes highly sensitive (may even be painful to touch) and retracts under the clitoralhood to avoid direct stimulation from the penis.

·         The man's testicles are withdrawn up into the scrotum.

·         Breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure continue to increase.

·         Muscle spasms may begin in the feet, face, and hands.

·         Muscle tension increases.

Phase 3: Orgasm

The orgasm is the climax of the sexual response cycle. It is the shortest of the phases and generally lasts only a few seconds. General characteristics of this phase include the following:

·         Involuntary muscle contractions begin.

·         Blood pressure, heart rate, and breathing are at their highest rates, with a rapid intake of oxygen.

·         Muscles in the feet spasm.

·         There is a sudden, forceful release of sexual tension.

·         In women, the muscles of the vagina contract. The uterus also undergoes rhythmic contractions.

·         In men, rhythmic contractions of the muscles at the base of the penis result in the ejaculation of semen.

·         A rash, or "sex flush" may appear over the entire body.

Phase 4: Resolution

During resolution, the body slowly returns to its normal level of functioning, and swelled and erect body parts return to their previous size and color. This phase is marked by a general sense of well-being, enhanced intimacy and, often, fatigue. Some women are capable of a rapid return to the orgasm phase with further sexual stimulation and may experience multiple orgasms. Men need recovery time after orgasm, called a refractory period, during which they cannot reach orgasm again. The duration of the refractory period varies among men and usually lengthens with advancing age.

FEMALE SEXUAL AROUSAL - EVERYONE EXPERIENCES SEXUAL AROUSAL DIFFERENTLY.

The beginnings of sexual arousal in a woman's body is usually marked by vaginal lubrication (wetness), swelling and engorgement of the external genitals, and internal enlargement of the vagina. There have been studies to find the degree of correlation between these physiological responses and the woman's subjective sensation of being sexually aroused: the findings usually are that in some cases there is a high correlation, while in others, it is surprisingly low. Further stimulation can lead to further vaginal wetness and further engorgement and swelling of the clitoris and the labia, along with increased redness or darkening of the skin in these areas. Further changes to the internal organs also occur including to the internal shape of the vagina and to the position of the uterus within the pelvis. Other changes include an increase in heart rate as well as in blood pressure, feeling hot and flushed and perhaps experiencing tremors. A sex flush may extend over the chest and upper body. If sexual stimulation continues, then sexual arousal may peak into orgasm. After orgasm, some women do not want any further stimulation and the sexual arousal quickly dissipates. Suggestions have been published for continuing the sexual excitement and moving from one orgasm into further stimulation and maintaining or regaining a state of sexual arousal that can lead to second and subsequent orgasms.Some women have experienced such multiple orgasms quite spontaneously.

While young women may become sexually aroused quite easily, and reach orgasm relatively quickly with the right stimulation in the right circumstances, there are physiological and psychological changes to women's sexual arousal and responses as they age. Older women produce less vaginal lubrication and studies have investigated changes to degrees of satisfaction, frequency of sexual activity, to desire, sexual thoughts and fantasies, sexual arousal, beliefs about and attitudes to sex, pain, and the ability to reach orgasm in women in their 40s and after menopause. Other factors have also been studied including socio-demographic variables, health, psychological variables, partner variables such as their partner's health or sexual problems, and lifestyle variables. It appears that these other factors often have a greater impact on women's sexual functioning than their menopausal status. It is therefore seen as important always to understand the "context of women's lives" when studying their sexuality.

Reduced estrogen levels may be associated with increased vaginal dryness and less clitoral erection when aroused, but are not directly related to other aspects of sexual interest or arousal. In older women, decreased pelvic muscle tone may mean that it takes longer for arousal to lead to orgasm, may diminish the intensity of orgasms, and then cause more rapid resolution. The uterus typically contracts during orgasm and, with advancing age, those contractions may actually become painful.

Asexual problem, or sexual dysfunction, refers to a problem during any phase of the sexual response cycle that prevents the individual or couple from experiencing satisfaction from the sexual activity. The sexual response cycle has four phases: excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution.

While research suggests that sexual dysfunction is common (43% of women and 31% of men report some degree of difficulty), it is a topic that many people are hesitant to discuss. Fortunately, most cases of sexual dysfunction are treatable, so it is important to share your concerns with your partner and doctor.

Enhance your love life-sex power

Here are some tips to enhance your love life.

*      Have a good night sleep for at least  7 hours a day

*      Drink lot of water at least 3 to 4 liters a day

*      Avoid smoking, alcohol, coffee and tea

*      Make regular time for togetherness with your partner. It’s easy to put togetherness with your partner to behind as we look after kids, try to work, socialize with friends. If sex is your last schedule, then you will become tiered when you even think about it. It’s important you spend much quality time with your partner outside bedroom then that itself can enhance your sex life inside the bed room.

*      Don’t let sex become routine-

Ø  Don’t always have one partner be aggressor and other passive.  Swap the roles.

Ø  Initiate  sexual opportunity with surprises .Call home from your office saying “I am romantic today and I would like to make love” or a verbal invitation at unexpected time

Ø  Introduce new options into your sexual life. This must be accepted by the partners too. For example: this may be sensual massage before actual sex.

Ø  Try different sex positions.

Ø  Occasionally omit sexual intercourse from lovemaking sessions; you may even attain other pleasures that are equally arousing. Don’t think love life is only sex life. Spending your time with partner is itself is good part of relationship.

*      Keep some romance in your life. Some of the gestures are not ceremonial they make your spouse feel special and love. For example: go out with your partner to exotic location, a candle light dinner, second, third or even fourth honeymoon, give some special gift.

*      For variety of reason –aesthetic and otherwise not everyone shares the same sexual taste. If your partner won’t participate in some form of sex that you find quiet appealing, the most important thing to remember is that she or he is not rejecting you but only your activity. Don’t accuse your partner for this. Find some compromise solution.

*      If you are looking for every sexual encounter to be prodigious, earth shattering event then you ends up in failure. No too sexual encounters are same. One day you reach orgasm quickly and other day it is delayed.

*      Even the most loving spouse neglect expression of affection. Most often affection  is expressed in action more  meaningful than words, never hearing a word of affection  can be troubling and can lead  people  to question whether their partner really care them. When affection is expressed only during sex, and not at any other time, it can lead a person to think like this “I love having sexual intercourse with you” rather than “I love you.”

Intimacy can be defined as a process in which two caring persons share as freely as possible in the exchange of feelings, thoughts and action. Intimacy is marked by mutual sense of acceptance, commitment, tenderness, and trust. Communication in an intimate relationship differs in certain ways from communication with other people in life. This is because partners are truly committed, intimate relationship is based on assumption that neither one of them deliberately intents to hurt other. This assumption can’t be made in dealing with rest of the world. Difficulty initiating or maintaining intimate relationship affect sex life.

Female Sexual Problems and their Homoeo-pathic management

The causes of sexual problems are as varied and complex as the human race. Some problems stem from a simple, reversible physical problem. Others can stem from more serious medical conditions, difficult life situations, or emotional problems. Still others have a combination of causes. Any of the following can contribute to sexual problems:

 

1. Relationship problems: Discord in other aspects of the relationship between spouses, such as childrearing, or money, can cause sexual problems. Issues of control or even abuse in the relationship are especially harmful to sexual harmony. Such problems can prevent a woman from communicating her sexual wants and needs to her partner.

HOMOEOPATHIC BOOK CALLED SYNTHESIS REPERTORY mentions about relationship problem in the mind chapter. Loving couples can understand each other and there is no disharmony. When the spouses can’t understand each other or there is disharmony between then because there is no love between them basically. Synthesis repertory gives following symptoms.

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis

“MIND - AILMENTS FROM - love; disappointed” which has 53 remedies

“MIND - AVERSION - persons - certain, to” which has 30 remedies

When you don’t like your spouse then naturally there is aversion to sex. If you don’t like your spouse for long time you may feel rejected in relationship or feel isolated then synthesis gives following symptoms

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis

“MIND - AILMENTS FROM - rejected; from being” which has 13 remedies

“MIND - FEAR - rejection; of” which has 12 remedies

“MIND - FORSAKEN feeling - isolation; sensation of” which has 157 remedies

When she is engaged (even past relationship) with sexual relationship with another person other than her own spouse then there is underlying guilt which causes sexual dysfunction. The underlying guilt is treated then sexual dysfunction is removed. Then synthesis gives following symptoms

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis

“MIND - ANXIETY - conscience; anxiety of” which has 114 remedies

If there is constant fight between spouses for silly reasons there may be sexual dysfunctions. Then synthesis gives following symptoms

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis

“MIND – QUARRELSOME”  which has 196 remedies.                                                                   “MIND - CONTRADICTION - disposition to contradict” has 77 remedies

Basic reason why spouses quarrel is because one is critical or censorious of other spouse then following symptoms in synthesis are

MIND – CENSORIOUS” which has 140 remedies.

 

2. Emotional problems: Depression, anxiety (about sex or other things), stress, resentment, and guilt can all affect a woman's sexual function.

In Depression. You might not enjoy sex if you're depressed.

Homeopathic book called synthesis mentions about depression   in chapter mind. We will discuss what is mentioned in the book and its number of remedies. Depression is mentioned as sadness in the textbook

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis

“MIND – SADNESS” has about 634remedies

“MIND – GRIEF” has about 125 remedies

In Stress. Concerns about work, school, health or family can keep your mind active at night, making it difficult for a good sex. Stressful life events — such as the death or illness of a loved one, divorce, or a job loss — may lead to lack of good sex. Stress is usually an emotional disorder.

Homeopathic book called synthesis mentions about stress in chapter mind. We will discuss what is mentioned in the book and its number of remedies. Stress is not given directly. Since stress is emotional disorder numbers of symptoms are mention in synthesis.

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis

“MIND - AILMENTS FROM – excitement – emotional” has about 99 remedies

“MIND - AILMENTS FROM - death of loved ones” has 26 remedies

“MIND - AILMENTS FROM - love; disappointed” has 53 remedies

“MIND - AILMENTS FROM - business failure” has 17 remedies

“MIND - AILMENTS FROM - money; from losing” has 14 remedies

 

In Anxiety. Everyday anxieties as well as more-serious anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, may disrupt your sexual function.

Homeopathic book called synthesis mentions about post- traumatic stress disorder in chapter mind. We will discuss some of the following symptoms of post- traumatic stress disorder mentioned in the book and its number of remedies

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis

“MIND – ANXIETY” has about 492remedies

“MIND - THOUGHTS - tormenting - past disagreeable events, about” has four remedies

.MIND - THOUGHTS - persistent - unpleasant subjects, haunted by” has twelve  remedies

 

3. Insufficient stimulation: A woman's (or her partner's) lack of knowledge about sexual stimulation and response may prevent a woman from achieving a satisfactory experience. Poor communication between partners can also be a culprit here.

·         Homeopathic book called synthesis mentions about insufficient stimulation  result in lack of orgasm  in chapter  FEMALE GENITALIA

“FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - ORGASM – delayed” has 4 remedies

 

4. Gynecologic problems: A number of pelvic disorders can cause pain in intercourse and thus decrease satisfaction.

o    Vaginal dryness: The most common reason for this in younger women is insufficient stimulation. In older women, the decrease in estrogen that occurs in perimenopause or menopause is the cause of vaginal dryness. Poor lubrication can also be linked to hormone imbalances and other illnesses and to certain medications. It can inhibit arousal or make intercourse uncomfortable.

o    Vaginismus: This is a painful spasm of the muscles surrounding the vaginal opening that causes the vaginal opening to "tighten." It can prevent penetration or make penetration extremely painful. Vaginismus can be caused by injuries or scars from surgery, abuse, or childbirth, by infection, or by irritation from douches, spermicides, or condoms. It can also be caused by fear.

o    Sexually transmitted diseases: Gonorrhea, herpes, genital warts, chlamydia, and syphilis are infectious diseases spread by sexual contact. They can cause changes in the genitals that make sex uncomfortable or even painful.

o    Vaginitis: Inflammation and irritation of vaginal tissues due to infection or other causes can make intercourse uncomfortable or painful.

o    Endometriosis, pelvic mass, ovarian cyst, surgical scars: Any of these can cause an obstruction or anatomical changes that prevent intercourse or make it difficult or painful.

o    Pelvic inflammatory disease: This is an infection of the vagina that moves up into the cervix, uterus, and ovaries. It can be very painful on its own and make intercourse extremely painful.

o    Nerve damage after surgery: Unavoidable cutting of small nerves during pelvic surgery (such as hysterectomy) may decrease sensation and response.

 

5. Physical conditions: Many physical or medical conditions can decrease a woman's satisfaction with her sex life.

o    Tiredness (fatigue)

o    Chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, liver disease, kidney disease

o    Cancer

o    Neurologic disorders

o    Vascular (blood flow) disorders

o    Hormonal imbalances

o    Menopause

o    Pregnancy

o    Alcohol or drug abuse

·         Medications: Certain medications can reduce desire or arousal. One well-known group of drugs that have this effect are the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) group of antidepressants, which includes drugs such as Prozac and Zoloft. Others include certain chemotherapy drugs, drugs for high blood pressure, and antipsychotic medications.

·         Other medical treatments: Treatments such as radiation therapy for certain types of cancer can reduce vaginal lubrication. They can also make skin and the membranes lining the genitals tender and sensitive.

·         History of abuse: A woman who has suffered sexual or other abuse may have trouble trusting her partner enough to relax and become aroused. She may have feelings of fear, guilt, or resentment that get in the way of a satisfactory experience, even if she cares deeply about her current partner.

The underlying guilt is treated then sexual dysfunction is removed. The homeopathic book called synthesis gives following symptoms

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis

“MIND - ANXIETY - conscience; anxiety of” which has 114 remedies

If you don’t like your spouse for long time you may feel rejected in relationship or feel isolated then synthesis gives following symptoms

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis

“MIND - AILMENTS FROM - rejected; from being” which has 13 remedies

“MIND - FEAR - rejection; of” which has 12 remedies

“MIND - FORSAKEN feeling - isolation; sensation of” which has 157 remedies

 

6. Attitudes toward sex: Many people, either because of the way they were brought up or because of earlier bad experiences, don't view sex as a normal and enjoyable part of a couple's relationship. They may associate sex or sexual feelings with shame, guilt, fear, or anger. On the other hand are people who have unrealistic expectations about sex. Portrayals of sex in television and movies as always easy and fantastic mislead some people into believing that is how it is in real life. These people are disappointed or even distressed when sex is sometimes not earth-shattering or when a problem occurs.

Regarding the attitude towards sex the chapter female genitalia in synthesis books gives number of symptoms regarding diminished sexual desire due to attitude. Some are following symptoms

“FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - COITION - aversion to” has 78 remedies

“FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - SEXUAL DESIRE – diminished” has 144 remedies.

 

7. Sexual problems of the partner: If a woman's partner has sexual problems, such as impotence or lack of desire, this can inhibit her own satisfaction.

 

Who Is Affected by Sexual Problems?

Both men and women are affected by sexual problems. Sexual problems occur in adults of all ages. Among those commonly affected are those in seniors, which may be related to a decline in health associated with aging.

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ALL CONTRIBUTE TO SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION.

Watch your pregnancy

Your body has a great deal to do during pregnancy. Sometimes the changes taking place will cause irritation or discomfort, and on occasions they may seem quite alarming. There is rarely any need for alarm but you should mention anything that is worrying you to your maternity team. This page offers information on some of the more common problems during pregnancy and their homoeopathic management– click on the links below.

TWENTY FIVE COMMON PROBLEMS OF PREGNANCY AND THEIR HOMOEOPATHIC MANAGEMENT

Backache

 

High blood pressure and pre-eclampsia

 

Pelvic pain

 

Vaginal Bleeding

 

Constipation

 

Incontinence

 

Skin and hair

 

Vaginal discharge

 

Cramp

 

Itching

 

Stretch marks

 

Varicose veins

 

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT)

Indigestion and heartburn

 

Swollen ankles, feet, fingers

 

Vomiting and morning sickness in pregnancy

 

Faintness

 

Leaking nipples

Sleeplessness

 

Feeling Hot in pregnancy

 

Nosebleeds

 

Teeth and gums

 

 

Headaches

 

Piles (haemorrhoids)

 

Urinating a lot

 

 

1.       Backache

2.       Vaginal Bleeding

3.       Vaginal discharge

4.       Vomiting and morning sickness in pregnancy

5.       Constipation

6.       Piles (haemorrhoids)

7.       High blood pressure and pre-eclampsia

8.       Deep vein thrombosis (DVT)

9.       Cramp

10.    Faintness

11.    Feeling Hot in pregnancy

12.    Incontinence

13.    Urinating a lot

14.    Skin and hair

15.    Itching

16.    Stretch marks

17.    Swollen ankles, feet, fingers

18.    Varicose veins

19.    Indigestion and heartburn

20.    Leaking nipples

21.     Sleeplessness

22.    Pelvic pain

23.    Headaches

24.    Nosebleeds

25.    Teeth and gums

1. Pregnancy related Back ache

During pregnancy, the ligaments in your body naturally become softer and stretch to prepare you for labour. This can put a strain on the joints of your lower back and pelvis, which can cause backache. Eighty percent of women will experience back pain at some point during their pregnancies. The severity of this pain during pregnancy ranges from mild discomfort after standing for long periods of time to debilitating pain that interferes with daily life. Although back pain during pregnancy can be a sign of a more serious condition, including labor, in most cases, it is the result of changes happening within the body. Factors that Influence Back Pain during Pregnancy

The spine is vulnerable due to the following factors during pregnancy:

  • Hormone production during pregnancy makes joints less stable (to allow the pelvis to spread as the baby grows)
  • Typical weight gain of 25-35 pounds during pregnancy, with the majority or extra weight distributed around the abdomen
  • Increase in postural strain as the body compensates for changes in the pregnant woman's center of gravity

 

Avoiding backache in pregnancy

There are several things you can do to help prevent backache from happening, and to help you cope with an aching back if it does occur. The tips listed here can help you to protect your back – try to remember them every day:

·         avoid lifting heavy objects

·         bend your knees and keep your back straight when lifting or picking up something from the floor

·         move your feet when turning round to avoid twisting your spine

·         wear flat shoes as these allow your weight to be evenly distributed

·         work at a surface high enough to prevent you stooping

·         try to balance the weight between two bags when carrying shopping

·         sit with your back straight and well supported

·         make sure you get enough rest, particularly later in pregnancy

A firm mattress can also help to prevent and relieve backache. If your mattress is too soft, put a piece of hardboard under it to make it firmer. Massage can also help.

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related Back ache

Pregnancy related Back ache can be managed by variety of medicines available. SYNTHESIS REPERTORY A HOMOEOPATHIC BOOK mentions about 312 medicines for back ache and about seven medicines when it is related to pregnancy.

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ALL CONTRIBUTE TO BACKACHE.

2. Pregnancy related Vaginal Bleeding

Bleeding during pregnancy is relatively common but it can be a dangerous sign, and you should always contact your midwife or GP immediately if it happens to you. In early pregnancy you might get some perfectly harmless light bleeding, called 'spotting'. This is when the developing embryo plants itself in the wall of your womb. This often happens around the time that your first period after conception would have been due.

Causes of bleeding in pregnancy in early pregnancy

During the first 12 weeks of pregnancy, vaginal bleeding can be a sign of miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy. However, many women who bleed at this stage of pregnancy go on to have normal and successful pregnancies.

Miscarriage

If a pregnancy ends before the 24th week of pregnancy, it's called a miscarriage. Miscarriages are quite common in the first three months of pregnancy and around one in five confirmed pregnancies ends this way.

Many early miscarriages (before 14 weeks) happen because there is something wrong with the baby. There can be other causes of miscarriage, such as hormone or blood clotting problems.

 

Most miscarriages occur during the first 12 weeks (three months) of pregnancy and, sadly, most cannot be prevented. Find out more about symptoms of miscarriage.

Ectopic pregnancy

Ectopic pregnancies, when a fertilised egg implants outside the womb for example in the fallopian tube, can cause bleeding but are less common than miscarriages.

It's a dangerous condition because the fertilised egg can't develop properly outside the womb. The egg has to be removed – this can be through an operation or with medicines. Find out more about symptoms of ectopic pregnancy.

Causes of bleeding in late pregnancy

·         Cervical changes - can lead to bleeding, particularly after sex.

·         Vaginal infections

·         A 'show' - when the plug of mucus that has been in the cervix during pregnancy comes away signalling that the cervix is becoming ready for labour to start. It may happen a few days before contractions start or during labour itself. Find out about signs of labour and what happens.

·         Placental abruption - a serious condition in which the placenta starts to come away from the womb wall. Placental abruption usually causes stomach pain, and this may occur even if there is no bleeding.

·         Low-lying placenta (or placenta praevia) - when the placenta is attached in the lower part of the womb, near to or covering the cervix.  Bleeding from a low-lying placenta can be very heavy and put you and your baby at risk. You may be advised to to into hospital for emergency treatment and usually a caesarean will be recommended. Read more information on placenta praevia.

·         Vasa praevia - a rare condition where the baby's blood vessels run through the membranes covering the cervix. Normally the blood vessels would be protected within the umbilical cord and the placenta. When your waters break, these vessels may be torn and cause vaginal bleeding. The baby can lose a life-threatening amount of blood. It is very difficult to diagnose vasa praevia, but it may occasionally be identified before birth by an ultrasound scan. Vasa praevia should be suspected if there is bleeding and the baby's heart rate changes suddenly after the rupture of the membranes.

Finding out the cause of bleeding in pregnancy

To work out what is causing the bleeding, you may need to have a vaginal or pelvic examination, an ultrasound scan or blood tests to check your hormone levels. Your doctor will also ask you about other symptoms, such as cramp, pain and dizziness. Sometimes the cause of bleeding cannot be found.

If your symptoms are not severe and your baby is not due for a while, you will be monitored and, in some cases, kept in hospital for observation. How long you need to stay in hospital depends on the cause of the bleeding and how many weeks pregnant you are. Being in hospital enables staff to keep an eye on you and your baby so that they can act quickly if there are any further problems.

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related vaginal bleeding

Pregnancy related vaginal bleeding can be managed by variety of medicines available. SYNTHESIS REPERTORY A HOMOEOPATHIC BOOK mentions about 14 medicines for menses during pregnancy and one medicine when it is related to menses in first month. Metrorrhagia during pregnancy there are about32 remedies.

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ALL CONTRIBUTE TO VAGINAL BLEEDING.

 3. Vaginal discharge or leucorrhea in pregnancy

All women, whether they’re pregnant or not, have some vaginal discharge starting a year or two before puberty and ending after the menopause. How much discharge you have changes from time to time and it usually gets heavier just before your period.

Is it normal to have vaginal discharge in pregnancy?

Yes. Almost all women have more vaginal discharge in pregnancy. This is quite normal and happens for a few reasons. During pregnancy the cervix (neck of the womb) and vaginal walls get softer and discharge increases to help prevent any infections travelling up from the vagina to the womb.

Towards the end of pregnancy, the amount of discharge increases and can be confused with urine.

In the last week or so of pregnancy, your discharge may contain streaks of thick mucus and some blood. This is called a 'show' and happens when the mucus that has been present in your cervix during pregnancy comes away. It's a sign that the body is starting to prepare for birth, and you may have a few small 'shows' in the days before you go into labour.

Increased discharge is a normal part of pregnancy, but it's important to keep an eye on it and tell your doctor or midwife if it changes in any way.

When to see your midwife or GP

Tell your midwife or doctor if:

·         the discharge is coloured

·         it smells strange

·         you feel itchy or sore

Healthy vaginal discharge should be clear and white and should not smell unpleasant. If the discharge is coloured or smells strange, or if you feel itchy or sore, you may have a vaginal infection.

The most common infection is thrush, which your doctor can treat easily. You should not use some thrush medicines in pregnancy.

Always talk to your doctor, pharmacist or midwife if you think you have thrush. You can help prevent thrush by wearing loose cotton underwear, and some women find it helps to avoid perfumed soap or perfumed bath products.

Find out more about vaginal discharge, preventing thrush and treating thrush.

You should also tell your midwife or doctor if your vaginal discharge increases a lot in later pregnancy.

If you have any vaginal bleeding in pregnancy, you should contact your midwife or doctor. Lots of women lose a small amount of blood during pregnancy, and this is usually nothing to worry about. However, it can sometimes be a sign of a more serious problem such as a miscarriage or a problem with the placenta.

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related vaginal discharge

Pregnancy related vaginal discharge can be managed by variety of medicines available. SYNTHESIS REPERTORY A HOMOEOPATHIC BOOK mentions about 13medicines for vaginal discharge or leucorrhea during pregnancy and one medicine when vaginal discharge is related to abortion.

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ALL CONTRIBUTE TO VAGINAL DISCHARGE.

4. Vomiting and sickness in pregnancy

Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy, also known as morning sickness, is very common in early pregnancy. It's unpleasant but it doesn’t put your baby at any increased risk, and usually clears up between weeks 12 and 14 of pregnancy.

Some women get a very severe form of nausea and vomiting, called hyperemesis gravidarum (HG), which can be very serious. It needs specialist treatment, sometimes in hospital. Find out more about hyperemesis gravidarum.

With morning sickness, some women are sick (vomit) and some have a feeling of sickness (nausea) without being sick. The term ‘morning sickness’ is misleading. It can affect you at any time of the day or night, and some women feel sick all day long.

It’s thought that hormonal changes in the first 12 weeks are probably one of the causes of morning sickness or a lack of vitamin B6 in the diet.

For most women, the symptoms of nausea and vomiting usually begin before they’re nine weeks pregnant, around six weeks after their last period. Symptoms should ease as your pregnancy progresses. In 9 out of 10 women, symptoms disappear by the third month of pregnancy. However, some women experience nausea and vomiting for longer than this, and about one woman in 10 continues to feel sick after week 20.

How common is morning sickness?

During early pregnancy, nausea, vomiting and tiredness are common symptoms. Around half of all pregnant women experience nausea and vomiting, and around three in 10 women experience nausea without vomiting.

People sometimes consider morning sickness a minor inconvenience of pregnancy, but for some women it can have a significant adverse effect on their day-to-day activities and quality of life.

Treatments for morning sickness

If you have morning sickness, your GP or midwife will initially recommend that you try a number of changes to your diet and daily life to help reduce your symptoms. These include:

·         getting plenty of rest because tiredness can make nausea worse

·         if you feel sick first thing in the morning, give yourself time to get up slowly – if possible, eat something like dry toast or a plain biscuit before you get up

·         drinking plenty of fluids, such as water, and sipping them little and often rather than in large amounts, because this may help prevent vomiting

·         eating small, frequent meals that are high in carbohydrate (such as bread, rice and pasta) and low in fat – most women can manage savoury foods, such as toast, crackers and crispbread, better than sweet or spicy foods

·         eating small amounts of food often rather than several large meals, but don’t stop eating

·         eating cold meals rather than hot ones because they don’t give off the smell that hot meals often do, which may make you feel sick

·         avoiding foods or smells that make you feel sick

·         avoiding drinks that are cold, tart (sharp) or sweet

·         asking the people close to you for extra support and help – it helps if someone else can cook but if this isn’t possible, go for bland, non-greasy foods, such as baked potatoes or pasta, which are simple to prepare

·         distracting yourself as much as you can – often the nausea gets worse the more you think about it

·         wearing comfortable clothes without tight waistbands

If you have severe morning sickness, your doctor or midwife might recommend medication.

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related vomiting and morning sickness

Pregnancy related vomiting and morning sickness   can be managed by variety of medicines available. SYNTHESIS REPERTORY A HOMOEOPATHIC BOOK mentions about 96medicines for nausea during pregnancy and 107 medicines for vomiting related to pregnancy.

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ALL CONTRIBUTE MORNING SICKNESS.


Home management

Ginger eases morning sickness

There is some evidence that ginger supplements may help reduce nausea and vomiting. To date, there have not been any reports of adverse effects being caused by taking ginger during pregnancy. However, ginger products are unlicensed in the UK, so buy them from a reputable source, such as a pharmacy or supermarket. Check with your pharmacist before you use ginger supplements. You can find out more about vitamins and supplements in pregnancy.

Some women find that ginger biscuits or ginger ale can help reduce nausea. You can try different things to see what works for you.

Acupressure might help morning sickness

Acupressure on the wrist may also be effective in reducing symptoms of nausea in pregnancy. Acupressure involves wearing a special band or bracelet on your forearm. Some researchers have suggested that putting pressure on certain parts of the body may cause the brain to release certain chemicals that help reduce nausea and vomiting.

There have been no reports of any serious adverse effects caused by using acupressure during pregnancy, although some women have experienced numbness, pain and swelling in their hands.

When to see a doctor for morning sickness

If you are vomiting and can’t keep any food or drink down, there is a chance that you could become dehydrated or malnourished. Contact your GP or midwife immediately if you:

·         have very dark-coloured urine or do not pass urine for more than eight hours

·         are unable to keep food or fluids down for 24 hours

·         feel severely weak, dizzy or faint when standing up

·         have abdominal (tummy) pain

·         have a high temperature (fever) of 38°C (100.4°F) or above

·         vomit blood

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) can also cause nausea and vomiting. A UTI is an infection that usually affects the bladder but can spread to the kidneys.

If you have any pain when passing urine or you pass any blood, you may have a urine infection and this will need treatment. Drink plenty of water to dilute your urine and reduce pain. You should contact your GP within 24 hours.

Risk factors for morning sickness

A number of different factors may mean you are more likely to have NVP. These include:

·         nausea and vomiting in a previous pregnancy

·         a family history of NVP or morning sickness

·         a history of motion sickness, for example in a car

·         a history of nausea while using contraceptives that contain oestrogen

·         obesity – where you have a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more

·         stress

·         multiple pregnancies, such as twins or triplets

·         first pregnancy
 

5. Constipation in pregnancy

You may become constipated very early in pregnancy because of the hormonal changes in your body.

Avoiding constipation

There are a few things you can do to help prevent constipation. These include:

·         eat foods that are high in fibre, such as wholemeal breads, wholegrain cereals, fruit and vegetables, and pulses such as beans and lentils (find out more about healthy eating in pregnancy) ref website: http://worldofhomoeopathictreatment.com/ppt/CONSTIPATION-PREVENTION.html

·         exercise regularly to keep your muscles toned (find out more about exercise in pregnancy) 

·         drink plenty of water

·         avoid iron supplements as they can make you constipated – ask your doctor if you can manage without them or change to a different type

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related constipation

Pregnancy related constipation   can be managed by variety of medicines available. SYNTHESIS REPERTORY A HOMOEOPATHIC BOOK mentions about 425medicines for constipation and 28 medicines for constipation related to pregnancy.

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ALL CONTRIBUTE MORNING SICKNESS

6. Coping with haemorrhoids when pregnant

Piles, also known as haemorrhoids, are enlarged and swollen veins in or around the lower rectum and anus. Anyone can get piles – they don't just happen in pregnancy. When you're pregnant, piles can occur because hormones make your veins relax.

Piles may itch, ache or feel sore. You can usually feel the lumpiness of piles around your anus. They may also bleed a little and can make going to the toilet uncomfortable or painful. You may also notice pain when passing a stool (faeces, poo) and a discharge of mucus afterwards. Sometimes you may feel as though your bowels are still full and need emptying. 

Piles usually go within weeks after the birth.  Haemorrhoids are classified into two general categories: internal and external.

Internal haemorrhoids lie far enough inside the rectum that you can't see or feel them. They don't usually hurt because there are few pain-sensing nerves in the rectum. Bleeding may be the only sign that they are there. Sometimes internal haemorrhoids prolapse, or enlarge and protrude outside the anal sphincter. If so, you may be able to see or feel them as moist, pink pads of skin that are pinker than the surrounding area. Prolapsed haemorrhoids may hurt because they become irritated by rubbing from clothing and sitting. They usually recede into the rectum on their own; if they don't, they can be gently pushed back into place.

External haemorrhoids lie within the anus and are often uncomfortable. If an external haemorrhoid prolapses to the outside (usually in the course of passing a stool), you can see and feel it. Blood clots sometimes form within prolapsed external haemorrhoids, causing an extremely painful condition called a thrombosis. If an external haemorrhoid becomes thrombosed, it can look rather frightening, turning purple or blue, and could possibly bleed. Despite their appearance, thrombosed haemorrhoids are usually not serious and will resolve themselves in about a week. If the pain is unbearable, the thrombosed haemorrhoid can be removed with suitable homeopathic drugs, which stops the pain.

Anal bleeding and pain of any sort is alarming and should be evaluated; it can indicate a life-threatening condition, such as colorectal cancer. Haemorrhoids are the main cause of anal bleeding and are rarely dangerous, but a definite diagnosis from your doctor is essential.

 

How to ease piles

Constipation can cause piles and if this is the case try to keep your stools soft and regular.

You can help ease piles, and prevent them, by making some changes to your diet and lifestyle:

·         eat plenty of food that is high in fibre, like wholemeal bread, fruit and vegetables, and drink plenty of water – this will prevent constipation, which can make piles worse (find out more about healthy eating in pregnancy)

·         avoid standing for long periods

·         take regular exercise to improve your circulation

·         you may find it helpful to use a cloth wrung out in iced water to ease the pain – hold it gently against the piles

·         if the piles stick out, push them gently back inside  or suitable homeopathic medicines

·         avoid straining to pass a stool as this may make your piles worse

·         after passing a stool, clean your anus with moist toilet paper instead of dry toilet paper

·         pat, rather than rub, the area

There are homoeopathic medicines that can help soothe inflammation around your anus. These treat piles.

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related haemorrhoids or piles

Pregnancy related haemorrhoids   can be managed by variety of medicines available. SYNTHESIS REPERTORY A HOMOEOPATHIC BOOK mentions about 278medicines for haemorrhoids or piles and 17 medicines for piles related to pregnancy. Around 174 symptoms and its medicines are given in the book.

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ALL CONTRIBUTE PILES.

7. Pregnancy-induced hypertension and pre-eclampsia

Gestational hypertension, also referred to sometimes as pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) is a condition of high blood pressure during pregnancy.  Gestational hypertension can lead to a serious condition called preeclampsia (also sometimes referred to as toxemia). Hypertension during pregnancy affects about 6-8% of all pregnant women. Preeclampsia is a condition that occurs only during pregnancy. Diagnosis is made by the combination of high blood pressure and protein in the urine, occurring after week 20 of pregnancy. Preeclampsia may also be called toxemia and is often precluded by gestational hypertension. Preeclampsia affects about 2-6% of healthy, first time moms.

The Symptoms Of Preeclampsia?

Mild preeclampsia: high blood pressure, water retention, and protein in the urine. If you have mild preeclampsia and your baby has not reached full development, your doctor will probably recommend you do the following:

  • Rest, lying on your left side to take the weight of the baby off your major blood vessels.
  • Increase prenatal checkups.
  • Consume less salt
  • Drink at least 8 glasses of water a day
  • Change your diet to include more protein

 

Severe preeclampsia: headaches, blurred vision, inability to tolerate bright light, fatigue, nausea/vomiting, urinating small amounts, pain in the upper right abdomen, shortness of breath, and tendency to bruise easily. Contact your doctor immediately if you experience blurred vision, severe headaches, abdominal pain, and/or urinating very infrequently .

 

During pregnancy your blood pressure and urine will be checked at every antenatal appointment. This is because a rise in blood pressure or protein in the urine can be the first sign of pre-eclampsia. Although pre-eclampsia usually presents as high blood pressure (pregnancy-induced hypertension) and protein in the urine (pre-eclamptic toxaemia), it can present in other ways

Pre-eclampsia can run in families and affects around 3-5% of pregnancies. Problems usually start towards the end of pregnancy, after around week 28, but can occur earlier. It can also happen after the birth. It is likely to be more severe if it starts earlier in pregnancy. 

 

Although most cases of pre-eclampsia are mild and cause no trouble, the condition can get worse and be serious for both mother and baby. It can cause fits (seizures) in the mother, which is called eclampsia. It can also affect the baby’s growth. If you develop pre-eclampsia, you will be offered regular ultrasound scans to check your baby's growth and health.

Pre-eclampsia is life-threatening for mother and baby if left untreated. That is why routine antenatal checks are so important to look for pregnancy-induced hypertension and protein in your urine (proteinuria).

Many women with high blood pressure can hope for a vaginal delivery after 37 weeks. But if you have severe pre-eclampsia it may be necessary to deliver your baby early, possibly by caesarean section.

Risk factors for pre-eclampsia

If you are at higher risk of pre-eclampsia, You are considered higher risk if you have one or more of the following risk factors:

·         this is your first pregnancy

·         you are aged 40 or over

·         your last pregnancy was more than 10 years ago

·         you are very overweight

·         you have a family history of pre-eclampsia

·         you are carrying more than one baby

Your risk of pre-eclampsia is also higher if any of the following apply to you:

·         you had high blood pressure before you became pregnant

·         you had high blood pressure in a previous pregnancy

·         you have chronic kidney disease, diabetes or a disease that affects the immune system, such as lupus

Symptoms of pre-eclampsia

There are usually no symptoms to warn you that you have hypertension or pre-eclampsia, and often the only way it can be detected is during the routine blood pressure and urine checks made by your midwife.

If you do have pre-eclampsia, you will probably feel well. If you get symptoms, these might include:

·         bad headaches

·         problems with vision, such as blurred vision or lights flashing before your eyes

·         pain just below the ribs

·         vomiting

·         sudden swelling of the face, hands and feet

However, you can have severe pre-eclampsia without any symptoms at all. If you get any of the symptoms listed above, or have any reason to think you have pre-eclampsia, contact your midwife, doctor or the hospital immediately.

Treatment of pre-eclampsia

Women with pre-eclampsia need admission to hospital and often medicines to lower their high blood pressure. Occasionally, pre-eclampsia is a reason to deliver the baby early – you may be offered induction of labour or caesarean section. 

Monitoring pre-eclampsia

It is vital to go to all your antenatal appointments, or to reschedule them if you can't make it to them, as severe pre-eclampsia can affect both your health and your baby’s health. If left untreated, it can put you at risk from a stroke, impaired kidney and liver function, blood clotting problems, fluid on the lungs and seizures. Your baby may also be born prematurely or small or even stillborn.

While the root cause of pre-eclampsia is not known, studies suggest that the risk is higher if you are overweight when you become pregnant, so it’s a good idea to reach a healthy weight before trying for a baby.

It is also more common if you have high blood pressure before becoming pregnant, or have had pre-eclampsia in a previous pregnancy. If this applies to you, attending regular check-ups to have your blood pressure and urine tested is even more important.
 

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related Hypertension

·         Pregnancy related hypertension can be managed by variety of medicines available. SYNTHESIS REPERTORY A HOMOEOPATHIC BOOK mentions about 150 medicines for hypertension and wide variety of problems are given in female chapter of same book in which Pregnancy during complaint which covers all problems related to pregnancy in general has about115 medicines.

As regarding pre-eclampsia symptom wise management of homeopathic management is possible

·         Excess protein in your urine (proteinuria) or additional signs of kidney problems: this can be controlled by considering totality of symptoms alone.

·         Severe headaches: SYNTHESIS REPERTORY mention 485medincines  for headache and headache associated with pregnancy has about 22 remedies

·         Changes in vision, including temporary loss of vision, blurred vision or light sensitivity: SYNTHESIS REPERTORY mention 259medincines  for dim vision and dim vision associated with pregnancy has about 2 remedies

·         Upper abdominal pain, usually under your ribs on the right side: SYNTHESIS REPERTORY mention 259medincines for ABDOMEN PAIN and ABDOMEN PAIN associated with pregnancy has about 18 remedies .Even the type of abdomen pain during pregnancy is mentioned further .Cramping pain in abdomen during pregnancy has 1 remedy, Dragging and bearing down pain in abdomen during pregnancy has about 3 remedies, Sore pain in abdomen has 6 remedies.

·         Nausea or vomiting

·         Decreased urine output: SYNTHESIS REPERTORY under the chapter bladder mentions about 94 remedies  for retarded urine and further must wait for long time   and  BLADDER - URINATION - urging to urinate - ineffectual - pregnancy agg.; during has 1 remedy is also mentioned .

·         Decreased levels of platelets in your blood (thrombocytopenia): SYNTHESIS REPERTORY under the chapter generals has about 5 remedies for thrombocytopenia.

·         Impaired liver function: SYNTHESIS REPERTORY under the chapter abdomen mention about 208 remedies related to liver region and its complaint and when it comes to pregnancy related liver compliant mentions about one remedy

·         Shortness of breath, caused by fluid in your lungs: SYNTHESIS REPERTORY under the chapter RESPIRATION  mention about 208 remedies for respiration difficult and 5 remedies are associated with respiration difficulty in  pregnancy

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH HYPERTESION AND PRE-ECLAMPSIA.
 

 8. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT)

 Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a serious condition where a blood clot develops, often in the deep veins of the legs but occasionally in the pelvis. It can be fatal if the clot dislodges and travels to the lungs. Pregnant women are more likely to develop thrombosis than non-pregnant women of the same age. A clot can form at any stage of pregnancy and up to six weeks after the birth.

Other factors that put you at risk of thrombosis include:

·         having had thrombosis (a clot) before

·         being over 35

·         having thrombophilia (a condition that makes clots more likely)

·         being obese (with a BMI of 30 or more) 

·         carrying twins or more

·         having fertility treatment

·         having just had a caesarean section

·         sitting still for long periods of time, including long-distance travel of more than four hours

·         being a smoker (get support to stop smoking)

·         dehydration

What are the symptoms of DVT?

The symptoms of DVT usually, but not always, occur in one leg only. Seek advice from your midwife or doctor immediately if you notice one or more of the following symptoms in your leg:

·         swelling

·         pain

·         warm skin

·         tenderness

·         redness, particularly at the back of the leg below the knee

During pregnancy it's common to experience swelling or discomfort in your legs, so this doesn't mean there's a serious problem. If you're worried, talk to your midwife or GP.

A pulmonary embolism (PE) is when a blood clot travels to the lungs. It can be fatal. Symptoms of PE include:

·         sudden difficulty breathing

·         chest pain or tightness

·         collapse

Once a DVT is diagnosed and treatment is started, the risk of developing a PE is very small.

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related DVT

HOMEOPATHIC MANAGEMNENT involves symptoms wise treatment. They are following symptoms of leg can be treated by Homoeopathy:

·         swelling

  • pain
  • warm skin
  • tenderness
  • redness, particularly at the back of the leg below the knee

Pregnancy related DVT can be managed by variety of medicines available. SYNTHESIS REPERTORY A HOMOEOPATHIC BOOK mentions about 18 medicines for thrombosis. Further in chapter extremity it mentions about 2 medicines for thrombosis. 

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ALL CONTRIBUTE MORNING SICKNESS

 9. Cramp in pregnancy

Cramp is a sudden, sharp pain, usually in your calf muscles or feet. It is most common at night. Nobody really knows what causes it, but there are some ideas about causes of cramp and why it can happen in pregnancy.

Avoiding cramp

Regular, gentle exercise in pregnancy, particularly ankle and leg movements, will improve your circulation and may help to prevent cramp occurring. Try these foot exercises:

·         bend and stretch your foot vigorously up and down 30 times

·         rotate your foot eight times one way and eight times the other way

·         repeat with the other foot

How to ease cramp

It usually helps if you pull your toes hard up towards your ankle or rub the muscle hard. You can find out more about treatment of cramp, but remember always to consult your midwife, GP or pharmacist before taking painkillers or any drugs in pregnancy.

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related cramps

Cramps can occur anywhere in your body and 2837 symptoms related to cramp alone are mentioned in different chapters in synthesis repertory. Around nine symptoms of cramps are related to pregnancy are taken from synthesis. With each of the symptoms number of medicines it has is also mentioned. They are

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis

STOMACH - PAIN - pregnancy - during - agg. – cramping” has one medicine

 “ABDOMEN - PAIN - pregnancy agg.; during – cramping” has 2 medicine

 “FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - PAIN - Uterus - pregnancy agg.; during” - has 3 medicine

“EXTREMITIES - CRAMPS – pregnancy” has 3 medicines

 “EXTREMITIES - CRAMPS - Feet - Soles - pregnancy agg.; during” has one medicine

 “EXTREMITIES - CRAMPS - Legs - pregnancy agg.; during” has 3 medicine

 “EXTREMITIES - CRAMPS - Legs - Calves - pregnancy agg.; during” has 7medicine

 “EXTREMITIES - CRAMPS - Toes - pregnancy agg.; during” has one medicine

 “SLEEP - SLEEPLESSNESS - pregnancy agg.; during - cramps in calves, from” has 6 medicine

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ALL CONTRIBUTE MORNING SICKNESS

NOTE: agg IS AGGRAVATION=INCREASED

10. Faint in pregnancy

Pregnant women often feel faint. This is because of the hormonal changes occurring in your body. Fainting happens if your brain is not getting enough blood and therefore not enough oxygen.

You are most likely to feel faint if you stand too quickly from a chair or out of a bath, but it can also happen when you are lying on your back. You can find out more about causes of fainting.

Avoiding feeling faint

Here are some tips to help you cope:

·         try to get up slowly after sitting or lying down

·         if you feel faint when standing still, find a seat quickly and the faintness should pass – if it doesn’t, lie down on your side

·         if you feel faint while lying on your back, turn on your side

It’s better not to lie flat on your back in later pregnancy or during labour. Find out more about the symptoms that might mean you're going to faint, such as a sudden, clammy sweat, ringing in your ears and fast, deep breathing

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related fainting

Pregnancy related FAINTING can be managed by variety of medicines available. SYNTHESIS REPERTORY A HOMOEOPATHIC BOOK mentions about 332 medicines for FAINTNESS IN CHAPTER GENERAL. Further in same chapter it mentions about 8 medicines associated with pregnancy.

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ALL CONTRIBUTE FAINTING.

 11.Feeling hot in pregnancy

 

During pregnancy you’re likely to feel warmer than normal. This is due to hormonal changes and an increase in blood supply to the skin. You’re also likely to sweat more. It helps if you:

·         wear loose clothing made of natural fibres such as cotton, as these are more absorbent and breathe more than synthetic fibres

·         keep your room cool – you could use an electric fan to cool it down

·         wash frequently to help you feel fresh

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related feeling hot

Homeopathy gives important to thermal status of a patient in every disease. If the patient feels uncontrollable heat of body during pregnancy it can be managed.

CHAPTER GENERAL IN SYNTHESIS MENTIONS ABOUT 216 REMEDIES FOR HEAT SENSATION. REVERSE CONDITION OF EXESSIVE COLDNESS DURING PREGNANCY IS POSSIBLE.SYNTHESIS MENTIONS ABOUT LACK OF VITAL HEAT WITCH MEANS COLDESS OF BODY HAS ABOUT 278 REMEDIES.

 IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ALL CONTRIBUTE TO THERMALSTATUS OF THE PATIENT.

12. Incontinence in pregnancy

Incontinence is a common problem both during and after pregnancy. Sometimes pregnant women are unable to prevent a sudden spurt of urine or a small leak when they cough, laugh or sneeze, or when they move suddenly, or just get up from a sitting position. This may be temporary, because the pelvic floor muscles (the muscles around the bladder) relax slightly to prepare for the baby's delivery.

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related Incontinence

Pregnancy related INCONTINENCE can be managed by variety of medicines available. SYNTHESIS REPERTORY A HOMOEOPATHIC BOOK mentions about 246medicines for urination involuntary which is equals to INCONTINECE.109 symptoms of involuntary urination (incontinence) is found in same book. Following symptoms and number of medicines with each of the symptoms of incontinence are related to pregnancy are mentioned in the same book.

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis

“BLADDER - URINATION - involuntary - night - pregnancy agg.; during” has 1 remedy

 “BLADDER - URINATION - involuntary - cough agg.; during - pregnancy agg.; during” has 1 remedy

“BLADDER - URINATION - involuntary - pregnancy agg.; during” has 11 remedies

 IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH INFLUENCE THE DISEASE.

NOTE: agg IS AGGRAVATION=INCREASED

 

13. Urinating a lot in pregnancy

Needing to urinate (pass water, or pee) often may start in early pregnancy. Sometimes it continues throughout pregnancy. In later pregnancy it is the result of the baby’s head pressing on your bladder.

How to reduce the need to pass urine

If you find that you need to get up in the night to pass urine, try cutting out drinks in the late evening. But make sure you drink plenty of non-alcoholic, caffeine-free drinks during the day. Later in pregnancy, some women find it helps to rock backwards and forwards while they are on the toilet. This lessens the pressure of the womb on the bladder so that you can empty it properly.

When to get help

If you have any pain while passing water or you pass any blood in your urine, you may have a urine infection, which will need treatment. Drink plenty of water to dilute your urine and reduce pain. You should contact your GP within 24 hours of first noticing these symptoms. You can find out more about:

·         symptoms of urinary infections

·         treating urinary infections

Don't take any medicines without asking your midwife, doctor or pharmacist whether they are safe in pregnancy.

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related Urinating a lot

Pregnancy related frequent urination or urinating a lot is mentioned in synthesis repertory. SYNTHESIS REPERTORY A HOMOEOPATHIC BOOK mentions about 290 medicines for urination frequent.

14. Skin and hair changes in pregnancy

Hormonal changes taking place in pregnancy will make your nipples and the area around them go darker. Your skin colour may also darken a little, either in patches or all over.

Birthmarks, moles and freckles may also darken. Some women develop a dark line down the middle of their stomach. These changes will gradually fade after the baby is born, although your nipples may remain a little darker.

If you sunbathe while you are pregnant, you may find you burn more easily. Protect your skin with a high-factor sunscreen and don’t stay in the sun for a long time.

Hair growth can also increase in pregnancy, and your hair may be greasier. After the baby is born, it may seem as if you are losing a lot of hair but you are simply losing the extra hair.

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related skin and hair change

Normally skin and nipple colour changes during pregnancy and does not require treatment. However if it excessive suitable homoeopathic medicine can correct the skin changes.

15. Itching and obstetric cholestasis in pregnancy

Mild itching is common in pregnancy because of the increased blood supply to the skin. Later on, as your bump grows, the skin of your tummy (abdomen) is stretched and this may also feel itchy. Mild itching is usually nothing to worry about, but if the itching becomes severe, it can be a sign of a liver condition called obstetric cholestasis, or intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP). This affects fewer than 1 in 100 pregnant women, but needs medical attention.

This page has information on:

·         dealing with mild itching

·         obstetric cholestasis, or intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy

Mild itching

Wearing loose clothes may help prevent itching, as your clothes are less likely to rub against your skin and cause irritation. You may also want to avoid synthetic materials and opt for natural ones, such as cotton, instead. These are "breathable" and allow the air to circulate close to your skin. You may find that having a cool bath or applying lotion or moisturiser can help to soothe the itching.

Some women find that products with strong perfumes can irritate their skin, so you could try using plain lotion or soap.

Mild itching is not usually harmful to you or your baby, but it can sometimes be a sign of a more serious condition. If you're worried, or if you have severe itching, it's important to see your midwife or doctor.

Serious itching: obstetric cholestasis

 

Obstetric cholestasis (OC), also called intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP), is a potentially serious liver disorder that can develop in pregnancy. Normally, bile salts flow from your liver to your gut to help you digest food. In obstetric cholestasis, the bile salts don’t flow properly and build up in your body instead. There’s no cure for OC, but it clears up once you’ve had your baby.

OC seems to run in families, although it can occur even if there is no family history. It is also more common in women of Indian and Pakistani origin. If you have had OC in a previous pregnancy, you’re more likely to develop it again in a subsequent pregnancy.

Some studies have found that babies of women with OC are more likely to be born prematurely or to be stillborn. It’s not known how much higher the risk of stillbirth is compared to women who don’t have OC. There is no reliable way to work out your baby’s individual risk of stillbirth.

Because of the link with stillbirth, you may be offered induction of labour or a caesarean sectionafter 37 weeks of pregnancy if you have OC. You will probably be advised to give birth in hospital, under a consultant-led maternity team.

Symptoms of OC

The main symptom is severe generalised itching (all over your body), usually without a rash, most commonly in the last four months of pregnancy. Some women get itching and a severe rash. For some women with OC, the itching is non-stop or unbearable, and can be worse at night. The itching is sometimes more pronounced on the palms of your hands and the soles of your feet.

Other symptoms include dark urine, jaundice (yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes) and pale bowel movements (poo).

OC is diagnosed through taking a medical and family history, and blood tests that check your liver function. These are known as liver function tests (LFTs). Once OC is diagnosed, you will have regular LFTs until your baby is born, so that your doctor can monitor your condition. If your LFTs are normal and you continue to have severe itching, the LFTs may be repeated every week or two to keep an eye on them.

 

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related itching

IN HOMOEOPATHIC BOOK CALLED SYNTHESIS REPERTORY UNDER CHAPTER SKIN MENTIONS ABOUT 325 REMEDIES FOR ITCHING.1573 KIND OF ITCHING RELATED SYMPTOMS AND ITS MEDICINES ARE MENTIONED IN SYNTHESIS.NINE REMEDIES FOR ITCHING RELATED TO PREGANCY IS MENTIONED IN SAME BOOK.

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ALL  ACCORDING TO HOMOEPATHY INFLUENCE ITCHING.

16. Pregnancy stretch marks

Stretch marks are narrow pink or purplish streak-like lines that can develop on the surface of the skin. They're also known as stria or striae. If you get them, they usually appear on your tummy, or sometimes on your upper thighs and breasts as your pregnancy progresses. The first sign you notice might be itchiness around an area where the skin is becoming thin and pink.

What causes stretch marks?

Stretch marks are very common in the general population and don't just affect pregnant women. They can happen whenever the skin is stretched for example, when we're growing during puberty or when putting on or losing weight, but hormonal changes in pregnancy can affect your skin and make you more likely to get stretch marks.

Our skin is made up of three main layers – the epidermis (the outer layer), the dermis (the middle layer) and the subcutis (the inner layer). Stretch marks happen in the middle layer, when the skin is stretched quite a bit over a short time. This stretching can break the dermis in places, forming stretch marks.

Whether or not you get stretch marks depends on your skin type, as some people's skin is more elastic. After your baby is born, the marks should gradually fade and become less noticeable, but they won't go away completely.

Pregnancy weight gain

You are more likely to get stretch marks if your weight gain is more than average in pregnancy. Most women gain between 10kg and 12.5kg (22 and 28lb) in pregnancy, although weight gain varies a great deal from woman to woman. How much weight you gain depends on your weight before you were pregnant. It's important that you don't diet to lose weight when you're pregnant, but you should eat a healthy, balanced diet.

If you are worried about your weight, talk to your midwife or GP. They may give you advice if you weigh more than 100kg (about 15.5 stone) or less than 50kg (about eight stone).

Stretch marks are not harmful. They don't cause medical problems and there's usually no need to see your GP, because there isn't a specific treatment for them. Over time, your skin will shrink and the stretch marks will fade into white-coloured scars.

Preventing stretch marks

Some creams claim to remove stretch marks once they've appeared, but there is no reliable evidence that they work. There is also limited evidence about whether oils or creams help prevent stretch marks from appearing in the first place.

A review of two studies looking at two specific creams marketed as preventing stretch marks found that massaging the skin may help to prevent stretch marks in pregnancy.

The studies suggested that there was little or no benefit for women who developed stretch marks in a previous pregnancy, but that women who had developed stretch marks in puberty seemed more likely to benefit from massaging cream.
However, more research is needed into whether creams or massaging the skin can help to prevent stretch marks
.

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related stretch mark

Pregnancy related stretch mark are normal. If it continues for long time it can be corrected by suitable homoeopathic drug.

17. Swollen ankles, feet and fingers

Ankles, feet and fingers often swell a little in pregnancy as your body is holding more water than usual. Towards the end of the day, the extra water tends to gather in the lowest parts of the body, especially if the weather is hot or if you have been standing a lot. The gradual swelling isn't harmful to you or your baby, but it can be uncomfortable.

Avoiding and easing swollen ankles

There are some steps you can take to prevent swollen feet and ankles. These can also help to ease the discomfort if your feet and ankles are feeling swollen already. Try to:

·         avoid standing for long periods

·         wear comfortable shoes – avoid tight straps or anything that might pinch if your feet swell

·         put your feet up as much as you can – try to rest for an hour a day with your feet higher than your heart, for example propped up with cushions as you lie on the sofa

·         do the foot exercises described below

Foot exercises

You can do foot exercises sitting or standing. They improve blood circulation, reduce swelling in the ankles and prevent cramp in the calf muscles:

·         bend and stretch your foot up and down 30 times

·         rotate your foot in a circle eight times one way and eight times the other way

·         repeat with the other foot

Get more tips on exercising in pregnancy.

When swelling can be serious

You should seek medical attention immediately if your face, feet or hands swell up suddenly. A pregnancy condition called pre-eclampsia can cause sudden swelling like this, although most women with swelling don't have pre-ecplampsia.

If it happens to you, contact your midwife, doctor or hospital immediately. If you do have pre-eclampsia, you’ll need to be monitored carefully, as the condition can be serious for both you and your baby.

Other signs of pre-eclampsia can include:

·         severe headache

·         problems with vision, such as blurring or flashing before the eyes

·         severe pain just below the ribs

·         vomiting

Risk factors for pre-eclampsia include:

·         being aged 40 or older

·         not having had children (nulliparity)

·         a 10-year gap since your last pregnancy

·         a family history of pre-eclampsia

·         having had pre-eclampsia before

·         a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or above

·         pre-existing high blood pressure

·         kidney disease

·         a multiple pregnancy (having more than one baby)

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related swollen ankles feet and fingers

Medicines for Pregnancy related swollen ankles, feet and fingers are available in homoeopathy. HOMOEOPATHIC BOOK CALLED SYNTHESIS REPERTORY mentions about swollen ankles and feet and fingers in extremity chapter.

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis

“EXTREMITIES - SWELLING – Ankles” has about 92 remedies

“EXTREMITIES - SWELLING – Feet” has about 164 remedies

“EXTREMITIES - SWELLING – Fingers” has about 89 remedies

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH   ACCORDING TO HOMOEPATHY INFLUENCE SWELLING OF ANKELS, FEET AND FINGERS.

18. Varicose veins in pregnancy

Varicose veins are veins that have become swollen. The veins in the legs are most commonly affected. You can also get varicose veins in the vulva (vaginal opening). They usually get better after the birth.

If you have varicose veins you should:

·         try to avoid standing for long periods of time

·         try not to sit with your legs crossed

·         try not to put on too much weight as this increases the pressure

·         sit with your legs up as often as you can, to ease the discomfort

·         try sleeping with your legs higher than the rest of your body – use pillows under your ankles or put books under the foot of your bed

·         do foot exercises and other antenatal exercises, such as walking and swimming, which will all help your circulation

Try these foot exercises:

·         bend and stretch your foot up and down 30 times

·         rotate your foot eight times one way and eight times the other

·         repeat with the other foot

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related varicose vein

Medicines for Pregnancy related varicose vein are available in homoeopathy. HOMOEOPATHIC BOOK CALLED SYNTHESIS REPERTORY mentions about varicose vein  in chapter general

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis

“GENERALS - VARICOSE veins” has about 134 remedies.

“GENERALS - VARICOSE veins - pregnancy agg.; during” has about 20 remedies

 21 different symptoms of varicose vein and its medicine are available are mentioned in synthesis.

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ACCORDING TO HOMOEPATHY INFLUENCE ALL DISEASE.

 

NOTE: agg IS AGGRAVATION=INCREASED


19. Indigestion and heartburn in pregnancy

Indigestion – also known as dyspepsia – in pregnancy is partly caused by hormonal changes, and in later pregnancy by the growing womb pressing on your stomach.

As many as eight out of 10 women experience indigestion at some point during their pregnancy. The symptoms of indigestion can include feeling full, feeling sick or nauseous, and burping. The symptoms usually come on after eating food.

Heartburn is a strong, burning pain in the chest caused by stomach acid passing from your stomach into your oesophagus (the tube that leads from your mouth to your stomach).

You can help ease the discomfort of indigestion and heartburn by making changes to your diet and lifestyle, and there are treatments that are safe to take in pregnancy.

Symptoms of indigestion

Causes of indigestion in pregnancy

Treatment for indigestion and heartburn in pregnancy

Self-help tips for indigestion and heartburn

Symptoms of indigestion in pregnancy

Symptoms of indigestion and heartburn in pregnancy are the same as for anyone else with the condition. The main symptom is pain or a feeling of discomfort in your chest or stomach. This usually happens soon after eating or drinking, but there can sometimes be a delay between eating a meal and developing indigestion.

You may experience indigestion at any point during your pregnancy, although your symptoms may be more frequent and severe during later pregnancy, from 27 weeks onwards. As well as pain, indigestion may cause:

·         heartburn, a burning sensation caused by acid passing from the stomach into the oesophagus

·         feeling uncomfortable or heavy

·         belching (burping)

·         regurgitation (food coming back up from the stomach)

·         bloating

·         nausea (feeling sick)

·         vomiting (being sick)

Causes of indigestion in pregnancy

The symptoms of indigestion (dyspepsia), including heartburn, are caused by stomach acid coming into contact with the sensitive protective lining (mucosa) of your digestive system.

The stomach acid breaks down the mucosa, which causes irritation and leads to the symptoms of indigestion. When you're pregnant, you are more likely to have indigestion due to:

·         hormonal changes that your body is going through

·         your growing womb (uterus) pressing on your stomach

·         the relaxing of the lower oesophageal sphincter (ring of muscle) that acts like a gate between your stomach and your oesophagus, allowing stomach acid to leak back up

You may be more likely to get indigestion in pregnancy if:

·         you had indigestion before you were pregnant

·         you have been pregnant before

·         you are in the latter stages of pregnancy

Your GP or midwife will usually be able to diagnose indigestion or heartburn from your symptoms and by asking you some questions. For example, they might ask:

·         how the symptoms are affecting your day-to-day life

·         what your usual eating habits are

·         if you have tried any treatments already

·         if you experienced indigestion or any other stomach conditions before you were pregnant

Your GP or midwife may also examine your chest and stomach. They may press gently on different areas of your chest and stomach to see whether this is painful.

Treatments for indigestion and heartburn in pregnancy

In some cases, changes to your diet and lifestyle may be enough to control indigestion, particularly if the symptoms are mild.

If you have severe indigestion, or if changes to your diet and lifestyle don't work, your GP or midwife may suggest using medication to help ease your symptoms. Several indigestion medicines are safe to use during pregnancy. However, check with your GP, midwife or pharmacist before taking anything they have not recommended.

The types of medicines that may be prescribed for indigestion and heartburn during pregnancy are:

Iron supplements

If you are prescribed an antacid medicine and you are also taking iron supplements, do not take them at the same time. Antacids can prevent iron from being properly absorbed by your body. Take your antacid at least two hours before or after your iron supplement.

Self-help tips for indigestion in pregnancy

You may not need medicine to control your symptoms. Your GP or midwife may suggest some of the following changes to your diet and lifestyle. In many cases, these changes can be enough to ease your symptoms.

Stop smoking to banish indigestion

Smoking when you're pregnant can cause indigestion and seriously affect your health, as well as the health of your unborn baby. Smoking increases the risk of:

·         your baby being born prematurely (before week 37 of your pregnancy)

·         your baby being born with a low birth weight

·         cot death, or sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)

When you smoke, the chemicals you inhale can contribute to your indigestion. These chemicals can cause the ring of muscle at the lower end of your oesophagus to relax. This allows stomach acid to leak back up into your oesophagus more easily (known as acid reflux).

If you smoke, quitting is the best thing that you can do for your own and your baby's health. You can speak to your GP or midwife for more information.

Avoid alcohol to ease indigestion

Drinking alcohol can contribute to the symptoms of indigestion. During pregnancy, it can also put your unborn baby at risk of developing serious birth defects. The Department of Health recommends that all pregnant women avoid drinking alcohol completely during pregnancy. It advises that if you do choose to drink while you're pregnant, to minimise risks to your baby you should not drink more than 1-2 units of alcohol once or twice a week, and should not get drunk.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends that pregnant women and women planning to become pregnant should avoid drinking alcohol in the first three months of pregnancy because there may be an increased risk of miscarriage.

One UK unit is 10ml (or eight grams) of pure alcohol. This is equal to:

·         half a pint of beer, lager or cider at 3.5% alcohol by volume (ABV: you can find this on the label)

·         a single measure (25ml) of spirit, such as whisky, gin, rum or vodka, at 40% ABV

·         half a standard (175ml) glass of wine at 11.5% ABV

If you have difficulty cutting down what you drink, talk to your midwife, doctor or pharmacist.

Eat healthily to avoid indigestion

You are more likely to get indigestion if you are very full, so regularly eating large amounts of food may make your symptoms worse. If you are pregnant, it can be tempting to eat more than you would normally, but this may not be good for you or your baby. You don't need to "eat for two".

During pregnancy you do not need to go on a special diet, but it is important to eat a variety of different foods every day to get the right balance of nutrients that you and your baby need. Find out more about eating a healthy diet in pregnancy and foods to avoid.

You can eat:

Fruit and vegetables

Starchy foods (carbohydrates)

Protein

Dairy

Foods those are high in sugar or fat

Healthy snacks

Preparing food safely

Healthy Start vouchers

You don’t need to go on a special diet, but it's important to eat a variety of different foods every day to get the right balance of nutrients that you and your baby need.

 

Change your eating habits

In some cases, you may be able to control your indigestion by making changes to the way you eat. For example:

·         it may help to eat smaller meals more frequently, rather than larger meals three times a day

·         avoid eating within three hours of going to bed at night

·         sit up straight when you eat because this will take the pressure off your stomach

Drinking a glass of milk may relieve heartburn (the burning sensation from stomach acid leaking up into your oesophagus). You may want to keep a glass of milk beside your bed in case you wake up with heartburn in the night.

Avoid indigestion triggers

You may find that your indigestion is made worse by certain triggers, such as:

·         drinking fruit juice

·         eating chocolate

·         bending over

Make a note of any particular food, drink or activity that seems to make your indigestion worse and avoid them if possible. This may mean:

·         eating less rich, spicy and fatty foods

·         cutting down on drinks that contain caffeine, such as tea, coffee and cola (find out more about caffeine and pregnancy)

Prop your head up

When you go to bed, use a couple of pillows to prop your head and shoulders up, or raise the head of your bed by a few inches by putting something underneath the mattress.

The slight slope should help prevent stomach acid from moving up into your oesophagus while you sleep.

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related indigestion and heartburn

Symptomatic treatment of indigestion is possible by analyzing the each of the symptoms of indigestion and its mention in the Homoeopathic book synthesis. We will discuss each of the symptoms and its mention in the synthesis and number of remedies it has. Common indigestion symptoms include:

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis

·         abdominal pain,

Homeopathic book called synthesis mentions about abdomen pain in chapter abdomen. We will discuss what is mentioned in the book and its number of remedies

“ABDOMEN – PAIN” has 321 remedies

“ABDOMEN - PAIN - pregnancy agg.; during” has about19 remedies.

.

·         heartburn or acid indigestion (acid reflux),

Homeopathic book called synthesis mentions about heart burn in chapter stomach. We will discuss what is mentioned in the book and its number of remedies.

“STOMACH – HEARTBURN” has about 248 remedies

“STOMACH - HEARTBURN - pregnancy agg.; during” has about 17 remedies

 

·         bloating (full feeling),

Homeopathic book called synthesis mentions about fullness of abdomen in chapter abdomen. We will discuss what is mentioned in the book and its number of remedies.

“ABDOMEN - FULLNESS, sensation of” has about 190 remedies

 

·         excessive gas (belching, burping or flatulence or eructation ),

Homeopathic book called synthesis mentions about belching, burping or flatulence or eructation in chapters of  abdomen and stomach. We will discuss what is mentioned in the book and its number of remedies.

“ABDOMEN – FLATULENCE” has about 365 remedies

“STOMACH – ERUCTATIONS” has about 405 remedies

 

·         nausea with or without vomiting,

·         acidic taste in the mouth,

Homeopathic book called synthesis mentions about acid taste in chapters of mouth. We will discuss what is mentioned in the book and its number of remedies. Mouth taste acid is given in the book as sour in chapter mouth.

“MOUTH - TASTE – sour” has about 177 remedies

 ·         gurgling, rumbling, or growling stomach discomfort,

Homeopathic book called synthesis mentions about gurgling, rumbling, or growling stomach discomfort in chapter stomach. We will discuss what is mentioned in the book and its number of remedies.

“ABDOMEN – GURGLING” has about 141 remedies

“ABDOMEN – RUMBLING” has about 332 remedies

 

·         constipation or diarrhea, and.

Diarrhea during pregnancy can be managed better without side effects. Homeopathic book called synthesis mentions about diarrhea in chapter rectum We will discuss what is mentioned in the book and its number of remedies.

“RECTUM – DIARRHEA” has about 578 remedies

Diarrhea in its variant with time modality is given in detail in synthesis. Diarrhea in each part of the day –morning, noon, forenoon, evening and night is given with its corresponding remedies are mentioned in the book. Even type of stool-including colours, offensiveness is given along with its medicine are given.

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ACCORDING TO HOMOEPATHY INFLUENCE ALL DISEASE.

20. Leaking from your nipples

Some women notice leaking from their nipples during pregnancy and this is normal.

In pregnancy, the breasts may start to produce milk weeks or months before you are due to have your baby. It can happen as early as 14 weeks of pregnancy.

If your nipples are leaking, the substance is usually colostrum, which is the first milk your breasts make in preparation for feeding your baby. Leaking is normal and nothing to worry about. If it bothers you, you can try putting a tissue or an absorbent breast pad (sometimes called maternity breast pads, or nursing pads) in your bra to absorb the milk. Breast pads are available in some pharmacies and mother and baby shops.

When to get help

If the milk leaking from your breasts becomes bloodstained, talk to your midwife or GP.

After your baby is born and if you're breastfeeding, your breasts will probably leak milk. You can find out more about breastfeeding, including how to deal with common breastfeeding problems and expressing and storing breast milk.

Some women continue to produce milk up to two years after they have stopped breastfeeding.

Find out more about your body after the birth. 

 

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related leaking from their nipples

Since leaking from nipple is normal it does not require any treatment.

21. Sleeplessness associated with pregnancy treated by healthy diet

Is it normal to feel tired in pregnancy?

It's common to feel tired, or even exhausted, during pregnancy, especially in the first 12 weeks.

Hormonal changes at this time can make you feel tired, nauseous and emotional. The only answer is to try to rest as much as possible. Make time to sit with your feet up during the day, and accept any offers of help from colleagues and family. Being tired and run-down can make you feel low. Try to look after your physical health – eat a healthy diet and get plenty of rest and sleep.

Healthy diet:

Vitamin supplements in pregnancy

Eating a healthy, varied diet in pregnancy will help you to get most of the vitamins and minerals you need. There are some vitamins and minerals that are especially important.

It is best to get vitamins and minerals from the food you eat, but when you are pregnant you will need to take some supplements as well to make sure you get everything you need. It's recommended that you take:

·         10 micrograms of vitamin D each day throughout your pregnancy and if you breastfeed

·         400 micrograms of folic acid each day – you should take this from before you are pregnant until you are 12 weeks pregnant

Do not take vitamin A supplements, or any supplements containing vitamin A (retinol), as too much could harm your baby.

You can get supplements from pharmacies and supermarkets, or your GP may be able to prescribe them for you. If you want to get your folic acid or vitamin D from a multivitamin tablet, make sure that the tablet does not contain vitamin A (or retinol).

Folic acid before and during pregnancy

Folic acid is important for pregnancy as it can help prevent birth defects known as neural tube defects, such as spina bifida. You should take a 400 microgram folic acid tablet every day while you are trying to get pregnant and until you are 12 weeks pregnant. If you didn't take folic acid before you conceived, you should start as soon as you find out that you are pregnant.

You should also eat foods that contain folate (the natural form of folic acid), such as green leafy vegetables and brown rice. Some breakfast cereals, breads and margarines have folic acid added to them.

Higher dose folic acid

Some women have an increased risk of having a pregnancy affected by a neural tube defect, and are advised to take a higher dose of 5 milligrams (5mg) of folic acid each day until they are 12 weeks pregnant. Women have an increased risk if they:

·         or their partner have a neural tube defect

·         have had a previous pregnancy affected by a neural tube defect

·         or their partner have a family history of neural tube defects

·         have diabetes 

In addition, women who are taking anti-epileptic medication should consult their GP for advice, as they may also need to take a higher dose of folic acid. Find out more about epilepsy, anti-epileptic medication and pregnancy.

If any of the above applies to you, talk to your GP as they can prescribe a higher dose of folic acid. Your GP or midwife may also recommend additional screening tests during your pregnancy.

Vitamin D in pregnancy

Vitamin D regulates the amount of calcium and phosphate in the body; these are needed to keep bones and teeth healthy.

You need to take vitamin D during your pregnancy to provide your baby with enough vitamin D for the first few months of its life. You should take a supplement of 10 micrograms of vitamin D each day when you are pregnant and if you breastfeed.

In children, not having enough vitamin D can cause their bones to soften and can lead to rickets (a disease that affects bone development in children).

Vitamin D can be found naturally in oily fish (such as salmon, mackerel and sardines), eggs and meat. Some manufacturers add it to some breakfast cereals, soya products, some dairy products, powdered milk, and fat spreads such as margarine.

The best source of vitamin D is summer sunlight on your skin. The amount of time you need in the sun to make enough vitamin D is different for every person, and depends on things such as skin type, the time of day and the time of year. However, you don't need to sunbathe: the amount of sun you need to make enough vitamin D is less than the amount that causes tanning or burning. If you have dark skin or always cover your skin, you may be at particular risk of vitamin D deficiency. Talk to your midwife or doctor if this applies to you.

 

Iron in pregnancy

If you are short of iron, you’ll probably get very tired and may suffer from anaemia. Lean meat, green leafy vegetables, dried fruit, and nuts contain iron. If you'd like to eat peanuts or foods that contain peanuts (such as peanut butter) during pregnancy, you can do so as part of a healthy balanced diet unless you're allergic to them or your health professional advises you not to.

Many breakfast cereals have iron added. If the iron level in your blood becomes low, your GP or midwife will advise you to take iron supplements.

 

Vitamin C in pregnancy

Vitamin C protects cells and helps keep them healthy.

A balanced diet containing fruit and vegetables, including broccoli, citrus fruits, tomatoes, bell peppers, and blackcurrants, can provide all the vitamin C that you need.

Calcium in pregnancy

Calcium is vital for making your baby's bones and teeth. Dairy products and fish with edible bones – such as sardines – are rich in calcium. Breakfast cereals, dried fruit – such as figs and apricots – bread, almonds, tofu (a vegetable protein made from soya beans) and green leafy vegetables – such as watercress, broccoli and curly kale – are other good sources of calcium.

You also need to know which foods to avoid in pregnancy.

Vegetarian, vegan and special diets in pregnancy

A varied and balanced vegetarian diet should give enough nutrients for you and your baby during pregnancy. However, you might find it hard to get enough iron and vitamin B12. Talk to your midwife or doctor about how to make sure you are getting enough of these important nutrients.

If you are vegan (you cut out all animal products from your diet), or you follow another type of restricted diet because of food intolerance (for example, a gluten free diet for coeliac disease) or for religious reasons, talk to your midwife or GP. Ask to be referred to a dietitian for advice on how to make sure you are getting all the nutrients you need for you and your baby
.

Healthy Start vitamins

Includes milk and plain fresh and frozen vegetables at local shops. Healthy Start vitamin tablets for women are specially designed for pregnant and breastfeeding women, and contain vitamins C and D and folic acid.

Healthy Start children's vitamin drops are for infants aged from six months to five years old, and contain vitamins A, C and D.

                                                                                           

Later on in pregnancy, you may feel tired because of the extra weight you are carrying. Make sure you get plenty of rest. As your bump gets bigger, it can be difficult to get a good night's sleep. You might find it uncomfortable lying down or, just when you get comfortable, you have to get up to go to the loo.

Feeling tired won't harm you or your baby, but it can make life feel more difficult, especially in the early days before you've told people about your pregnancy.

Strange dreams during pregnancy

Some women have strange dreams or nightmares about the baby and about labour and birth. This is normal. Talking about them to your partner or midwife can help you. Remember, just because you dream something, it doesn't mean it's going to happen. Relaxation and breathing techniques may be helpful in reducing any anxiety you might be feeling.

Bump-friendly sleep positions

Sleep however you feel comfortable. Lying on your back after around 16 weeks can be uncomfortable, and later on can also mean that your womb presses on one of the main blood vessels. This can make you feel faint.

Sleeping on your side might be more comfortable. You can try supporting your bump with pillows, and put a pillow between your knees. Towards the end of pregnancy, as your bump becomes heavy, you might find it more comfortable to prop yourself up with pillows so that you're almost in a sitting position. Sleeping propped up like this can sometimes help with pregnancy heartburn too.

Insomnia remedies in pregnancy

Try not to let it bother you if you can't sleep, and don't worry that it will harm your baby – it won't. If you can, nap during the day, and get some early nights during the week. Avoid tea, coffee or cola drinks in the evening as the caffeine can make it harder to go to sleep.

Try to relax before bedtime so that you're not too wide awake. Relaxation techniques may also help. Your antenatal classes may teach relaxation techniques, or you could borrow a relaxation tape, CD or DVD from your library.

You could join an antenatal yoga class class. Make sure the instructor knows that you are pregnant. Exercise can help you to feel less tired, so even if you're feeling tired during the day; try to get some activity, such as a walk at lunchtime or going swimming. If the lack of sleep is bothering you, talk to your partner, a friend, doctor or midwife.

You can find out more about preventing insomnia, including daytime habits such as exercising and bedtime habits such as avoiding caffeine, alcohol and smoking.

Medical reasons for insomnia in pregnancy

Occasionally, sleeplessness – when accompanied by other symptoms – can be a sign of depression. If you have any of the other symptoms of depression, such as feeling hopeless and losing interest in the things you used to enjoy, speak to your doctor or midwife. There is treatment that can help. Find out more about mental health problems in pregnancy.

Healthtalkonline has videos and written articles of women talking about their symptoms and feelings in the early weeks of pregnancy, including tiredness.

 

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related Sleeplessness

Insomnia is a persistent disorder that can make it hard to fall asleep, hard to stay asleep or both, despite the opportunity for adequate sleep. With insomnia, you usually awaken feeling unrefreshed, which takes a toll on your ability to function during the day. Insomnia can sap not only your energy level and mood but also your health, work performance and quality of life.

Homeopathic treatment includes treating the cause of insomnia which includes:

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis.

·         Stress. Concerns about work, school, health or family can keep your mind active at night, making it difficult to sleep. Stressful life events — such as the death or illness of a loved one, divorce, or a job loss — may lead to insomnia. Stress is usually an emotional disorder

Homeopathic book called synthesis mentions about stress in chapter mind. We will discuss what is mentioned in the book and its number of remedies. Stress is not given directly. Since stress is emotional disorder numbers of symptoms are mention in synthesis.

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis

“MIND - AILMENTS FROM – excitement – emotional” has about 99 remedies

“MIND - AILMENTS FROM - death of loved ones” has 26 remedies

“MIND - AILMENTS FROM - love; disappointed” has 53 remedies

“MIND - AILMENTS FROM - business failure” has 17 remedies

·         Anxiety. Everyday anxieties as well as more-serious anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, may disrupt your asleep. Worry about being able to go to sleep can make it harder to fall asleep.

Homeopathic book called synthesis mentions about anxiety in chapter mind. We will discuss what is mentioned in the book and its number of remedies

“MIND – ANXIETY” has about 492remedies

·         Depression. You might either sleep too much or have trouble sleeping if you're depressed. Insomnia often occurs with other mental health disorders as well.

Homeopathic book called synthesis mentions about depression   in chapter mind. We will discuss what is mentioned in the book and its number of remedies. Depression is mentioned as sadness in the textbook

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis

“MIND – SADNESS” has about 634remedies

“MIND – GRIEF” has about 125 remedies

 

·         Medical conditions. If you have chronic pain, breathing difficulties or a need to urinate frequently, you might develop insomnia. Examples of conditions linked with insomnia include arthritis, cancer, heart failure, lung disease, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), overactive thyroid, stroke, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. These include treating the cause of disease using homoeopathic drugs

·         Change in your environment or work schedule. Travel or working a late or early shift can disrupt your body's circadian rhythms, making it difficult to sleep. Your circadian rhythms act as an internal clock, guiding such things as your sleep-wake cycle, metabolism and body temperature.

“GENERALS - TRAVELLING - ailments from” has about 23 remedies

SEE STRESS FOR MORE MANAGEMENT

·         Poor sleep habits. Poor sleep habits include an irregular sleep schedule, stimulating activities before bed, an uncomfortable sleep environment, and use of your bed for activities other than sleep or sex.

·         Caffeine, nicotine and alcohol. Coffee, tea, cola and other caffeine-containing drinks are well-known stimulants. Drinking coffee in the late afternoon and later can keep you from falling asleep at night. Nicotine in tobacco products is another stimulant that can cause insomnia. Alcohol is a sedative that may help you fall asleep, but it prevents deeper stages of sleep and often causes you to awaken in the middle of the night. Abstaining from coffee nicotine and alcohol itself is its management

·         Eating too much late in the evening. Having a light snack before bedtime is OK, but eating too much may cause you to feel physically uncomfortable while lying down, making it difficult to get to sleep. Many people also experience heartburn, a backflow of acid and food from the stomach into the esophagus after eating, which may keep you awake. This can be corrected by suitable Homoeopathic medicine.

 

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ACCORDING TO HOMOEOPATHY INFLUENCE ALL DISEASES.

22.  Pelvic pain in pregnancy

Some women develop pelvic pain in pregnancy. This is sometimes called pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain (PPGP) or symphysis pubis dysfunction (SPD).

Symptoms of PPGP

PPGP is a collection of uncomfortable symptoms caused by a misalignment or stiffness of your pelvic joints at either the back or front of your pelvis. PPGP is not harmful to your baby, but it can cause severe pain around your pelvic area and make it difficult for you to get around. Different women have different symptoms, and PPGP is worse for some women than others. Symptoms can include:

·         pain over the pubic bone at the front in the centre

·         pain across one or both sides of your lower back

·         pain in the area between your vagina and anus (perineum)

Pain can also radiate to your thighs, and some women feel or hear a clicking or grinding in the pelvic area. The pain can be most noticeable when you are:

·         walking

·         going upstairs

·         standing on one leg (for example, when you’re getting dressed or going upstairs)

·         turning over in bed

It can also be difficult to move your legs apart for example, when you get out of a car.

There is homoeopathic treatment to help, and techniques to manage the pain and discomfort. If you get the right advice and treatment early on, PPGP can usually be managed and the symptoms minimised. Occasionally, the symptoms even clear up completely. Most women with PPGP can have a normal vaginal birth.

Who gets pelvic pain in pregnancy?

It’s estimated that PPGP, or SPD as it's sometimes known, affects up to one in five pregnant women to some degree. It’s not known exactly why pelvic pain affects some women, but it’s thought to be linked to a number of issues, including previous damage to the pelvis, pelvic joints moving unevenly, and the weight or position of the baby.

Factors that may make a woman more likely to develop PPGP include:

·         a history of lower back or pelvic girdle pain

·         previous injury to the pelvis for example, from a fall or accident

·         having PPGP in a previous pregnancy

·         a hard physical job

When to get help for pelvic pain in pregnancy

Getting diagnosed as early as possible can help keep pain to a minimum and avoid long-term discomfort. Treatment by a physiotherapist usually involves gently pressing on or moving the affected joint, which helps it work normally again.

If you notice pain around your pelvic area, tell your midwife, GP or obstetrician. Ask a member of your maternity team for a referral to a manual physiotherapist who is experienced in treating pelvic joint problems. These problems tend not to get completely better until the baby is born, but treatment from an experienced practitioner can significantly improve the symptoms during pregnancy.

Treatments for pelvic pain in pregnancy

Physiotherapy aims to relieve or ease pain, improve muscle function and improve your pelvic joint position and stability. This may include:

·         manual therapy to make sure the joints of your pelvis, hip and spine move normally

·         exercises to strengthen your pelvic floor, stomach, back and hip muscles

·         exercises in water

·         advice and suggestions, including positions for labour and birth, looking after your baby and positions for sex

·         equipment, if necessary, such as crutches or pelvic support belts

Coping with pelvic pain in pregnancy

Your physiotherapist may recommend a pelvic support belt to help ease your pain, or crutches to help you get around. It can help to plan your day so that you avoid activities that cause you pain. For example, don’t go up or down stairs more often than you have to.

The Association for Chartered Physiotherapists in Women’s Health (ACPWH) also offers this advice:

·         Be as active as possible within your pain limits, and avoid activities that make the pain worse.

·         Rest when you can.

·         Get help with household chores from your partner, family and friends.

·         Wear flat, supportive shoes.

·         Sit down to get dressed – for example, don’t stand on one leg when putting on jeans.

·         Keep your knees together when getting in and out of the car – a plastic bag on the seat can help you swivel.

·         Sleep in a comfortable position – for example, on your side with a pillow between your legs.

·         Try different ways of turning over in bed – for example, turning over with your knees together and squeezing your buttocks.

·         Take the stairs one at a time, or go upstairs backwards or on your bottom.

·         If you’re using crutches, have a small backpack to carry things in.

·         If you want to have sex, consider different positions, such as kneeling on all fours.

ACPWH suggests that you avoid:

·         standing on one leg

·         bending and twisting to lift, or carrying a baby on one hip

·         crossing your legs

·         sitting on the floor, or sitting twisted

·         sitting or standing for long periods

·         lifting heavy weights, such as shopping bags, wet washing or a toddler

·         vacuuming

·         pushing heavy objects, such as a supermarket trolley

·         carrying anything in only one hand (try using a small backpack)

.

Labour and birth with pelvic pain

Many women with pelvic pain in pregnancy can have a normal vaginal birth. Plan ahead and talk about your birth plan with your birth partner and midwife. Write in your birth plan that you have PPGP, so the people supporting you during labour and birth will be aware of your condition.

Think about birth positions that are the most comfortable for you, and write them in your birth plan. Being in water can take the weight off your joints and allow you to move more easily, so you might want to think about having a water birth. You can discuss this with your midwife.

Your 'pain-free range of movement'

If you have pain when you open your legs, find out your pain-free range of movement. To do this, lie on your back or sit on the edge of a chair and open your legs as far as you can without pain – your partner or midwife can measure the distance between your knees with a tape measure. This is your pain-free range.

To protect your joints, try not to open your legs wider than this during labour and birth. This is particularly important if you have an epidural for pain relief in labour, as this will take away any pain that warns you that you are separating your legs too far. If you have an epidural, make sure your midwife and birth partner are aware of your pain-free range of movement of your legs.

When pushing in the second stage of labour, you may find it beneficial to lie on one side. This prevents your legs from being separated too much. You can stay in this position for the birth of your baby, if you wish.

Sometimes, it might be necessary to open your legs wider than your pain-free range to deliver your baby safely, particularly if you have an assisted delivery (for example, with the vacuum or ventouse). Even in this case, it is possible to limit the separation of your legs. Make sure your midwife and doctor are aware that you have PPGP. If this happens, your physiotherapist should assess you after the birth. Take extra care until they have assessed and advised you.

HealthTalkOnline has interviews with women talking about their experiences of pelvic pain in pregnancy and how they coped.

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related pelvic pain

Homeopathic book called synthesis mentions about pelvic pain in chapter abdomen. We will discuss what is mentioned in the book and its number of remedies. Many Symptoms related to pelvic is mentioned in the textbook. Some important ones are given below

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis.

 “ABDOMEN - ABSCESS – Pelvis” has about 6 remedies

“ABDOMEN - COMPLAINTS of abdomen - Pelvic organs” has two remedies

“ABDOMEN - COMPLAINTS of abdomen – Pelvis” has one remedy

“ABDOMEN - CONGESTION – Pelvis” has 6 remedies

“ABDOMEN - CONSCIOUS of the abdomen – Pelvis” has one remedy

“ABDOMEN - INJURY - Pelvic organs” has about one remedy

“ABDOMEN - CONSTRICTION - Inguinal region - extending around pelvis” has about one remedy

“ABDOMEN - HEAVINESS - Pelvic region” has about seven remedies

Note that pelvic problem is not due to injury which requires surgical correction.

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ACCORDING TO HOMOEPATHY INFLUENCE THE DISEASE.

23.Headaches in pregnancy

Headaches in women are often caused by hormones, and many women who are not pregnant notice a link with their periods. Menopause and pregnancy are also potential triggers.

 

Some pregnant women find they get a lot of headaches. Headaches can get worse in the first few weeks of pregnancy, but they usually improve or stop completely during the last six months. They don’t harm the baby but they can be uncomfortable for you.

Coping with headaches in pregnancy

Changes to your lifestyle may help to prevent headaches. Try to get more regular rest and relaxation. You could try a pregnancy yoga class. If you’re having problems sleeping, you can find out more about tackling this in tiredness and sleep in pregnancy.  

Taking paracetamol, painkillers, drugs containing codeine should be avoided in pregnancy, unless prescribed by your doctor. Speak to your pharmacist, midwife, GP, nurse or health visitor about how much paracetamol you can take and for how long.

 

When to seek help for headaches

If you often have bad headaches, tell your midwife or doctor so that they can advise you. Severe headaches can be a sign of high blood pressure and you should seek urgent advice, as this could indicate a serious condition called pre-eclampsia. Pre-eclampsia is a condition that affects some pregnant women during the second half of pregnancy or immediately after the delivery of their baby.

Women with pre-eclampsia have:

·         high blood pressure

·         fluid retention (oedema), and

·         protein in the urine (proteinuria)

If it's not treated, it can lead to serious complications. In the unborn baby, pre-eclampsia can cause growth problems.

Find out more about symptoms of pre-eclampsia and treating pre-eclampsia.

Find out more about health problems in pregnancy.

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related headache

Homeopathic book called synthesis mentions about headache in chapter head .Around 9829 symptoms of head pain and its medicines are found in the book. We will some important ones mentioned in the book and its number of remedies.

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis.

 

“HEAD – PAIN” has about 584 remedies

 

Pregnancy related pain is given below

 

“HEAD - PAIN - pregnancy agg.; during” has about 23 remedies

 

Major part  of the head chapter is dedicated to pain its variants like boring, tearing  etc  and also modality including time in which head pain is aggravated. Even the part of head which pains like right, left , forehead, temple, occiput are also given.

 

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ACCORDING TO HOMOEPATHY INFLUENCE THE DISEASE.

24. Nosebleeds/Epistaxis in pregnancy

Nosebleeds are quite common in pregnancy because of hormonal changes. They are usually short but can be quite heavy. Nosebleeds can be frightening but as long as you don't lose a lot of blood, there is nothing to worry about, and they can often be treated at home. The medical name for a nosebleed is epistaxis.

During a nosebleed, blood flows from one nostril, and sometimes from both. It can be heavy or light and last from a few seconds to more than 10 minutes. Nosebleeds can happen when you're asleep. You might feel liquid in the back of your throat before blood comes out of your nose, if you're lying down.

During pregnancy, you may also find that your nose gets more blocked up than usual.

How to stop a nosebleed

·         Sit down and firmly pinch the soft part of your nose, just above your nostrils, for 10 minutes.

·         Lean forward and breathe through your mouth. This will drain blood down your nose instead of down the back of your throat.

·         Stay upright, rather than lying down, as this reduces the blood pressure in the veins of your nose and will discourage further bleeding.

·         Maintain the pressure on your nose for up to 20 minutes (time this on the clock) so that the blood clots.

·         Place a covered ice pack on the bridge of your nose.

·         Avoid blowing your nose, bending down and strenuous activity for at least 12 hours after a nosebleed.

If the bleeding doesn't stop, seek medical advice.

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related nose bleeding

Homeopathic book called synthesis mentions about nose bleed/epistaxis in chapter nose. We will discuss what is mentioned in the book and its number of remedies. Many Symptoms related to nose bleeding is mentioned in the textbook. 204 symptoms of epistaxis are found in the text. Some important ones are given below

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis

“NOSE – EPISTAXIS” has about 314 remedies

 “NOSE - EPISTAXIS – profuse” has about 20 remedies.

 Nose bleeding during pregnancy related symptoms are

“NOSE - EPISTAXIS - pregnancy – during” has about 4 remedies

“NOSE - EPISTAXIS - pregnancy - during - whole pregnancy” has about 1 remedy
 

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ACCORDING TO HOMOEPATHY INFLUENCE THE DISEASE


25. Teeth and gums in pregnancy

 Some women get swollen and sore gums, which may bleed, in pregnancy. Bleeding gums are caused by a build-up of plaque on the teeth. Hormonal changes during pregnancy can make your gums more vulnerable to plaque, leading to inflammation and bleeding. This is also called pregnancy gingivitis or gum disease.

Your dentist will be able to help with this. Ask your doctor, nurse or midwife for assistance.

Keeping teeth and gums healthy in pregnancy

It's very important to keep your teeth and gums as clean and healthy as possible while you're pregnant. The best way to prevent or deal with gum problems is to practise good oral hygiene. Go to the dentist so they can give your teeth a thorough clean and give you some advice about keeping your teeth clean at home.

Here's how you can look after your teeth and gums:

·         Clean your teeth carefully twice a day for two minutes – ask your dentist to show you a good brushing method to remove all the plaque.

·         Brushing is best with a small-headed toothbrush with soft filaments – make sure it's comfortable to hold.

·         Avoid having sugary drinks (such as fizzy drinks or sweet tea) and sugary foods too often – try to keep them to meal times.

·         If you're hungry between meals, snack on vegetables and avoid sugary or acidic foods (get tips on healthy snacks).

·         Avoid mouthwashes that contain alcohol.

·         Stop smoking, as it can make gum disease worse.

If you have morning sickness and you vomit, rinse your mouth afterwards with plain water. This will help prevent the acid in your vomit attacking your teeth. Do not brush your teeth straight away as they will be softened by the acid from your stomach. Wait about an hour before doing so.

Dental treatments to avoid in pregnancy

Discuss with your dentist whether any new or replacement fillings should be delayed until after your baby is born. The Department of Health advises that amalgam fillings shouldn't be removed during pregnancy.

If you need a dental X-ray, your dentist will usually wait until you've had the baby, even though most dental X-rays don't affect the tummy (abdomen) or pelvic area. Make sure your dentist knows that you're pregnant.

 

Homoeopathic management of Pregnancy related teeth and gums problem

Homeopathic book called synthesis mentions about teeth problem in chapter teeth and gum problem in chapter mouth .We will discuss what is mentioned in the book and its number of remedies. Many Symptoms related to gum bleeding is mentioned in the textbook. Some important ones are given below.

Note: what is given in quotation is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis

Gingivitis is given as inflammation gums   in chapter mouth see below:

“MOUTH - INFLAMMATION – Gums” has about 73 remedies

“MOUTH - GUMS; complaints of” has about 76 remedies

“MOUTH - BLEEDING – Gums” has 163 remedies

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ACCORDING TO HOMOEPATHY INFLUENCE THE DISEASE.

Menopause

Menopause is the cessation of a woman's reproductive ability, the time in a woman's life when her menses naturally stops, most often after age of late 40’s or early 50’s; signalling the end of the fertile phase of a woman's life. Menopause happens because the woman's ovaries stop producing the hormones estrogen and progesterone.  It can instead be more accurately defined as the permanent cessation of the primary functions of the ovaries.

SYMPTOMS OF MENOPAUSE

Changes and symptoms can start several years earlier. They include

  • A change in periods - shorter or longer, lighter or heavier, with more or less time in between

·         Hot flashes and/or night sweats: Can be described as a sudden feeling of warmth or heat in the body. Hot flushes may occur on their own but are often accompanied by night sweats or excessive sweating during the day. Hot flushes and sweats can also be accompanied by feelings of nausea, dizziness or a general feeling of being unwell. There are other causes of hot flushes apart from the menopause. For example, men may sometimes experience the symptom but in general, when the term 'hot flush' is used, it refers to symptoms experienced by women going through the menopause.Hot flashes are a common symptom experienced by women prior to, and during the early stages of the menopausal transition. However, not all women approaching the menopause will develop hot flashes.

  • Trouble sleeping
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Mood swings
  • Trouble focusing
  • Less hair on head, more on face

Some symptoms require treatment. Talk to your doctor about how to best manage menopause.

 

MENOPAUSE FACTS

·         Menopause is defined as the absence of menstrual periods for 12 months. It is the time in a woman's life when the function of the ovaries ceases.

·         The process of menopause does not occur overnight, but rather is a gradual process. This so-called perimenopausal transition period is a different experience for each woman.

·         The average age of menopause is 51 years old, but menopause may occur as early as the 30s or as late as the 60s. There is no reliable lab test to predict when a woman will experience menopause.

·         The age at which a woman starts having menstrual periods is not related to the age of menopause onset.

·         Symptoms of menopause can include abnormal vaginal bleeding, hot flashes, vaginal and urinary symptoms, and mood changes.

·         Complications that women may develop after menopause include osteoporosis and heart disease.

·         Treatments for menopause are customized for each woman.

·         Treatments are directed toward alleviating uncomfortable or distressing symptoms.

Homoeopathic management of Menopause

Homeopathic book called synthesis mentions about menopause in chapter generals. We will discuss what is mentioned in the book and its number of remedies. As Many as 183 Symptoms and its corresponding medicines are found in the textbook. Some important ones are given below.

Note: what is given in below is directly taken from Homoeopathic book synthesis

MIND - ANGER - delusions during menopause; with

MIND - ANXIETY - fear; with - menopause; during

MIND - ANXIETY - health; about - own health; one's - menopause; during her

MIND - ANXIETY - menopause; during

MIND - CLIMACTERIC PERIOD

MIND - COMPLAINING - menopause; during

MIND - DELUSIONS - court; called before - menopause; during

MIND - DOUBTFUL - recovery, of - menopause; during

MIND - ESTRANGED - menopause; during

MIND - EXCITEMENT - menopause; during

MIND - FEAR - crowd, in a - menopause; during

MIND - FEAR - insanity - menopause; during

MIND - FEAR - open spaces; fear of - menopause; during

MIND - FEAR - recover, he will not - menopause; during

MIND - FORGETFUL - menopause; during

MIND - HYSTERIA - menopause; at

MIND - INDIFFERENCE - menopause; in

MIND - INSANITY - menopause, during

MIND - IRRITABILITY - menopause; during

MIND - LAUGHING - menopause; during

MIND - LAUGHING - weeping - same time; weeping and laughing at the - menopause; during

MIND - LOQUACITY - menopause; during

MIND - MANIA - menopause; during

MIND - MENOPAUSE agg.

MIND - MOROSE - menopause; at

MIND - NYMPHOMANIA - menopause; at

MIND - RESTLESSNESS - menopause; at

MIND - SADNESS - menopause, during

MIND - SENSITIVE - menopause; during

MIND - SIGHING - menopause; during

MIND - SUSPICIOUS - menopause; during

MIND - WEEPING - menopause; at

VERTIGO - MENOPAUSE

HEAD - HAIR - falling - menopause

HEAD - HEAT - flushes of - menopause; during

HEAD - HEAT - menopause; during

HEAD - HEAT - Vertex - menopause; during

HEAD - MENOPAUSE; during

HEAD - PAIN - menopause; during

HEAD - PAIN - Vertex - menopause; during

EYE - WEAK - menopause; at

EAR - NOISES in - menopause; during

EAR - PAIN - menopause; during

EAR - PAIN - noise agg. - menopause; during

NOSE - EPISTAXIS - menopause

NOSE - MENOPAUSE; during

NOSE - SMELL - acute - coffee - menopause; during

FACE - DISCOLORATION - dark - menopause; during

FACE - DISCOLORATION - red - menopause; during

FACE - EXPRESSION - anxious - menopause; during

FACE - HEAT - flushes - menopause; during

FACE - HEAT - menopause; during

MOUTH - SALIVATION - menopause; during

THROAT - LUMP; sensation of a - menopause; during

STOMACH - APPETITE - ravenous - menopause; during

STOMACH - EMPTINESS - menopause; during

STOMACH - NAUSEA - menopause

STOMACH - SINKING - menopause; during

STOMACH - VOMITING - menopause; during

STOMACH - VOMITING; TYPE OF - green - menopause; during

ABDOMEN - LIVER and region of liver; complaints of - menopause; during

ABDOMEN - PAIN - menopause, with sadness; during

RECTUM - DIARRHEA - menopause; during

RECTUM - DYSENTERY - menopause; during

RECTUM - DYSENTERY - women during menopause; in plethoric, nervous

RECTUM - HEMORRHAGE from anus - menopause; at

RECTUM - HEMORRHOIDS - menopause; during

BLADDER - URINATION - urging to urinate - frequent - menopause; during

URETHRA - PAIN - menopause

URINE - ODOR - putrid - menopause, during

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - COITION - aversion to - menopause; during

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - ITCHING - leukorrhea; from - menopause; during

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - LEUKORRHEA - acrid, excoriating - menopause; during

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - LEUKORRHEA - menopause; during

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - LEUKORRHEA - offensive - menopause, in

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - LEUKORRHEA - yellow - menopause; during

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - MENOPAUSE

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - MENOPAUSE - never well since

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - MENOPAUSE - sadness; with

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - MENSES - copious - menopause

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - MENSES - early; too - menopause; during

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - MENSES - frequent; too - menopause, in

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - MENSES - frequent; too - week - two weeks; every - menopause; at

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - MENSES - menopause

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - MENSES - painful - menopause, near the

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - MENSES - protracted - menopause; during

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - MENSES - return - menopause, after

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - MENSES - suppressed menses - menopause; during

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - METRORRHAGIA - menopause

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - PAIN - Uterus - menopause; during

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - POSTMENOPAUSAL BLEEDING

FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - SEXUAL DESIRE - increased - menopause; during

COUGH - MENOPAUSE; during

CHEST - CONGESTION - menopause; during

CHEST - HEMORRHAGE of lungs - menopause; during

CHEST - HYPERTROPHY - Mammae - menopause; during

CHEST - PAIN - menopause; during

CHEST - PAIN - periodical - menopause; during

CHEST - PAIN - Mammae - menopause; during

CHEST - PAIN - Mammae - Under - menopause; during

CHEST - PALPITATION of heart - menopause

CHEST - SWELLING - Mammae - menopause; during

EXTREMITIES - HEAT - Feet - Soles - menopause; during

EXTREMITIES - HEAT - Hands - Palms - menopause; during

EXTREMITIES - PAIN - Feet - menopause; during

EXTREMITIES - PAIN - Feet - Soles - menopause; during

EXTREMITIES - PAIN - Fingers - rheumatic - menopause; during

EXTREMITIES - PAIN - Hands - rheumatic - menopause; during

EXTREMITIES - PAIN - Hands - Palms - menopause; during

EXTREMITIES - PAIN - Joints - rheumatic - menopause; beginning at

EXTREMITIES - PAIN - Upper limbs - rheumatic - menopause; during

EXTREMITIES - ULCERS - Lower limbs - menopause; during

SLEEP - SLEEPLESSNESS - menopause; during

FEVER - MENOPAUSE; during

PERSPIRATION - NIGHT - menopause; during

PERSPIRATION - CLAMMY - menopause; during

PERSPIRATION - MENOPAUSE; during

PERSPIRATION - PROFUSE - menopause; during

SKIN - ERUPTIONS - urticaria - menopause; during

SKIN - ITCHING - menopause; during

SKIN - ULCERS - superficial - menopause; during

GENERALS - CHOREA - menopause; during

GENERALS - CONGESTION - blood; of - menopause; during

GENERALS - CONVALESCENCE; ailments during - menopause; after

GENERALS - CONVULSIONS - menopause; during

GENERALS - DIABETES MELLITUS - accompanied by - heat; flushes of - menopause; during

GENERALS - DROPSY - external dropsy - menstrual disorder during puberty or menopause

GENERALS - DROPSY - general; in - puberty or menopause; during

GENERALS - FAINTNESS - menopause; during

GENERALS - HEAT - flushes of - menopause; during

GENERALS - HEAT - lack of vital heat - menopause; during

GENERALS - HEMORRHAGE - menopause; in

GENERALS - HYPERTROPHY - one sided - menopause; during

GENERALS - MENOPAUSE

GENERALS - NUMBNESS - Externally - menopause; during

GENERALS - OBESITY - menopause; during

GENERALS - PAIN - menopause; during

GENERALS - REACTION - lack of - menopause; during

GENERALS - SEXUAL DESIRE - suppression of sexual desire - agg. - menopause; during

GENERALS - TREMBLING - Externally - menopause; during

GENERALS - TREMBLING - Internally - menopause; during

GENERALS - WEAKNESS - menopause; during

GENERALS - WEARINESS - menopause; during

OLD SYMPTOMS - HEAD - HAIR - falling - menopause

OLD SYMPTOMS - HEAD - HAIR - falling - menopause - females

OLD SYMPTOMS - HEAD - HEAT - menopause, at

OLD SYMPTOMS - HEAD - HEAT - Vertex - menopause, during

OLD SYMPTOMS - HEAD - HEAT - Vertex - menopause, during - prolapsus, with

OLD SYMPTOMS - HEAD - PAIN - violent pains - menopause; during

OLD SYMPTOMS - HEAD - PAIN - burning - menopause; during

OLD SYMPTOMS - HEAD - PAIN - burning - Vertex - menopause, during

OLD SYMPTOMS - EAR - PAIN - noises, from - menopause, during

OLD SYMPTOMS - STOMACH - APPETITE - ravenous - menopause, at

OLD SYMPTOMS - STOMACH - EMPTINESS - climacteric period

OLD SYMPTOMS - STOMACH - NAUSEA - menopause, during

OLD SYMPTOMS - STOMACH - NAUSEA - menopause, during - after

OLD SYMPTOMS - STOMACH - SINKING - climacteric period, in

OLD SYMPTOMS - BLADDER - URGING to urinate - frequent - climacteric, at

OLD SYMPTOMS - URETHRA - PAIN - menopause, during

OLD SYMPTOMS - URETHRA - PAIN - burning - menopause

OLD SYMPTOMS - FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - COITION - aversion to - menopause, during

OLD SYMPTOMS - FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - LEUKORRHEA - acrid, excoriating - menopause, during

OLD SYMPTOMS - FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - LEUKORRHEA - itching - menopause, in

OLD SYMPTOMS - FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - LEUKORRHEA - menopause, at

OLD SYMPTOMS - FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - LEUKORRHEA - menopause, at - continues after menses cease; leukorrhea

OLD SYMPTOMS - FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - LEUKORRHEA - yellow - menopause, at

OLD SYMPTOMS - FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - MENSES - copious - menopause, during

OLD SYMPTOMS - FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - MENSES - early, too - menopause; during

OLD SYMPTOMS - FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - MENSES - suppressed - menopause; during

OLD SYMPTOMS - FEMALE GENITALIA/SEX - SEXUAL DESIRE - increased - menopause, at

OLD SYMPTOMS - CHEST - HYPERTROPHY - Mammae - menopause, during

OLD SYMPTOMS - CHEST - PAIN - Mammae - Under - climacteric, during

OLD SYMPTOMS - EXTREMITIES - HEAT - Hand - Palm - menopause, during

OLD SYMPTOMS - EXTREMITIES - HEAT - Foot - Sole - menopause, during

OLD SYMPTOMS - EXTREMITIES - PAIN - Upper limbs - rheumatic - climacteric

OLD SYMPTOMS - EXTREMITIES - PAIN - Hand - rheumatic - climacteric

OLD SYMPTOMS - EXTREMITIES - PAIN - Fingers - rheumatic - climacteric

OLD SYMPTOMS - EXTREMITIES - PAIN - burning - Foot - climacteric

OLD SYMPTOMS - PERSPIRATION - MENOPAUSE

OLD SYMPTOMS - PERSPIRATION - MENOPAUSE - during

OLD SYMPTOMS - GENERALS - HEAT - flushes of - climacteric

OLD SYMPTOMS - GENERALS - HEAT - flushes of - menopause, during

OLD SYMPTOMS - GENERALS - TREMBLING - Internally - menopause, during

IN OUR CLINIC WE REPERTORISE THE PATIENT’S TOTALITY OF SYMPTOMS CONSIDERING ALL ASPECT INCLUDING HER LIFE STYLE, FOOD HABITS, AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS WHICH ALL ACCORDING TO HOMOEPATHY INFLUENCE MENOPAUSE.

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